St Cadoc's Court

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Glenys Jones,Jean Langley and Sylvia Price

For 26 years, Jean Langley was the Warden of St Cadoc’s Court for the Elderly. She loved her work which she defined as: ‘being a good neighbour’’. In those days, St Cadoc’s Court was more than a place to live — it was a family.These articles and stories have been donated by Jean Langley, Warden of St Cadoc's Chourt from its opening in her 26 years of service beginning in 1970.

Jean is a Monmouth girl. She moved to Raglan when she was 16 years of age. She married Brian and had three children: Marc, Jane and Ruth. An employee of the Monmouth Rural District, she began her career at 'Trevor Bowen Court' in Monmouth. As her children were getting older she wanted to be home when they got home from school. With this in mind she applied to be the Warden of the new care home in Raglan, known as St Cadoc’s Court. She tells us about the life at St Cadlc's Court.

St Cadoc's Court was in three parts: St Cadoc's Court, Sheltered housing and Bungalow's. Mary was the Warden, Sylvia was the second day deputy to Mary and second day deputy to Jean so they could take time off. Pensioners bungalow's had a pull cord for emergencies but no wardens. Two of these bungalow's were intended for disabled people.

Extended family - didn't have their own telephones - so Jean knew what was happening and could keep on top of things. Jean collected everyone's pills and distributed them.

Given a list of people that would be moving in (they were selected by the County). The people needed to be pension age (over 60). But they did have two residents under 60 (they had medical problems). They had about 4 couples in the first batch. Some had cars and could get along.

Billy Cornfields mum - had cancer, was one of the first people there.

St Cadoc's court opened its doors in 1970. It was the first purpose built elderly care community to be built in Monmouthshire. It included 24 old persons “flatlets” a with communal lounge and warden’s dwelling. This Award Winning building was designed by Arthur T Beer of Owen Luder Partnership, Newport and built by David Attwell & Richardson, Newport. It was built on the Auction Field and was owned by Harold Embry of the Brooks Farm (Harold was a local community counsellor). According to Jean, the man who designed St Cadoc’s Court lived at Kingcoed.

St Cadoc’s Court, Raglan, showing loggia and garden, 1971

The purpose of St Cadoc’s Court was “to house people that weren’t well and didn’t have other family to help them”. It served people from in the country as well as in the village. It was built as sheltered housing with the intent that people would live on their own independently with some support (in contrast to Residential Care in which the home takes care of all your needs). The £80,000 block of 23 old people’s flatlets was opened at Raglan in 1970 by Mr Edward Rowlands, Under-Secretary of State for Wales. But having a roof over your head is just the starting point. Jean and her team made it a community where people enjoyed their later years and were an integral part of the Village.

In the late 1960’s, sheltered housing was a new concept and St Cadoc’s Court was the first Sheltered housing built in Monmouthshire. Sheltered Housing was intended to meet the needs of people living on their own but needing some support. In contrast, residential care is defined as where the home takes care of all your needs. St Cadoc’s Court was cutting edge. It was very popular and certainly met a need as 17 flatlets were already occupied (along with the Warden’s accommodation) when the the facility opened. Five of the original residents were over 80 years of age. The senior being an 89 year old woman.

Each flatlet had a small hall, toilet with washbasin, a galley kitchen and living space. The two-person flats had separate living rooms and bedrooms, but the ‘bachelor’ flats had combined bedsitters. In addition to this bathrooms and showers were distributed throughout the building for use as required and for the convenience of the occupants. Each flatlet was completely self-contained, with the tenant having his or her own front door keys both for their premises and for the building as a whole. The tenants have the use of the laundrette, leisure rooms and a large garden. For those who would rather shop at home, a mobile serve visits the court.

Jean was always on call. “In every flatlet, there is an alarm button by the bed, which when pressed rings a bell in my office, or at night in our bedroom. This is just in case of emergency, such as if someone is ill, we then call the doctor. So far nothing has happened except that one lady got stuck in the bath and needed a bit of a hand.”

The building also has a communal lounge with an open fire and several sitting / reading areas. In Jean’s time, the lounge was the centre of life at St Cadoc’s Court. There was no need for anyone living in the building to feel lonely at any time, as recreational activities were arranged both in the lounge and reading areas. Residents also had their needs met including: meals on wheels, hairdressing, chiropody and library services that visit the building. The lounge was also used for religious services.

Over the years, Jean and her team ensured that St Cadoc’s Court met the social, religious and health needs of their residents. They arranged dinners, celebrations and outings (many of which were funded through raffles, sales and other fund raisers).

In 1971, St Cadoc’s Court was awarded the Housing Medal Award for “Higher Density Local Authority Schemes”. Jean was invited by the Secretary of State for Wales and the President of the Royal Institute of British Architects to the award ceremony held in the banqueting Hall, Cardiff Castle on Friday, 26 November 1971.

Jean Langley was the first Warden of St Cadoc’s Court. Previously at Trevor Bowen Court in Monmouth, Joan and her husband Brian along with their three children moved into the Warden’s lodgings. As her children were getting older she wanted to be home when they got home from school. With this in mind she applied to be the Warden of the new care home in Raglan, known as St Cadoc’s Court. It was tight for the whole family to live at St Cadoc's Court but they managed. All of the family pitched in and made St Cadoc’s a warm and loving place for the elderly. Jean was the Warden of St Cadoc’s Court while Brian was responsible for keeping the lawn tidy. Brian was affectionately known as ‘Mr Fixit’ at St Cadoc’s Court. In his ‘spare time’ Brian worked for Monmouthshire County Council in the residential home called Nanty derry House nr Goitre (residential care) The children, Marc, Jane and Ruth, also joined in the family and raised funds for outings and parties for the residents. They gave concerts for the residents and proved to be great favourites with them.

St Cadoc’s Court had three sections: St Cadoc's Court provided sheltered housing. The Bungalow's around St Cadoc’s Court were managed by Mary Morris (warden). Sylvia Price was the Assistant Warden. She worked 2 days a week for Mary and two days for Jean (so the Wardens could have time off). The Warden’s job was to look after the residents. In those days they didn't have their own telephones - so Jean knew what was happening and could keep on top of things. Jean collected everyone's pills and distributed them. She also liaised with the medical and spiritual needs of the residents.

The county selected the residents to come to St Cadoc’s Court. The people needed to be pension age (over 60). But they did have two residents under 60 (they had medical problems). They had about 4 couples in the first batch. Some had cars and could get along. One of the first residents was Billy Cornfields mum.

Jean loved having a big extended family (which is what she called the residents at St Cadoc’s Court). She recalls, “we celebrated birthdays and arranged outings. We had a coffee morning once a year to raise funds. In the winter we had a monthly schedule of entertainment (ex. WI singing sketches, girl guides enjoying a fireside sing along. There were always two religious services a month. On Monday’s residents had l Bingo and on wednesday mornings there was a coffee. Many of the residents belonged to the village Companions Club (they had outings once month). Many of the residents also went to gardening club. At Christmas time, was carol singing followed by sherry and a mince pie. In all, the residents had a good social life.

Queen's Silver Jubilee celebration at St Cadoc's Court. Top: visitors and residents - incl. Dr Johnson, wife and child (7 June, 1977)

Jean recalls, “We didn’t organise anyone. Most people prefered to watch their own television sets in the evening or to visit each other I was only there to help with any problems they may have; for example there was a bit of difficulty with decimalisation and getting long distance calls on the telephone.”

Twenty years later, in 1990, St Cadoc’s Court celebrated its 20th anniversary. The party brought together residents, staff and guests to enjoy a delicious birthday tea. Among the 17 residents present were three ladies who have been at St Cadoc’s since it opened - Mrs Edith Langley, Mrs Ann Fowler and Miss Nora Grant - as well as the Court’s oldest resident, Mrs. Sarah Moon (who was 94). St Cadoc’s Court continued to serve the elderly and enjoyed a close link with the community receiving regular visits from the various village associations. Church services were held three times a month. Many residents were members of local groups such as the VPA and Companions Club, or enjoyed an evening out at a whist drive. Those who had difficulty in getting out could take advantage of the frequent visits from hairdressing and library services.

‘We are one big happy family,’ said Mrs Langley whose husband Brian, a residential care officer at Nantyderry, devotes much of his spare time working for the Court where he is affectionately known as ‘Mr Fixit!’

Along with the social life at St Cadoc’s, was the spiritual as well as medical support given to the residents.

Over the years, St Cadoc’s Court lost its glow. The flatlets with their communal baths no longer stood up to today’s standards and the rooms were not handicapped accessible. After Jean retired, the number of Wardens were reduced, the rooms emptied and new people were not admitted. Sadly the entertainments and activities became long gone as were the outings. A few years ago the building was torn down and the elderly must now leave the village for their care. We are grateful for Jean and the other staff at St Cadoc’s Court for showing us what community care REALLY means.

Click here to see more photo's of life at St Cadoc's Court


St Cadoc’s Court Staff: Jean Langley (Warden, St Cadoc’s Court, 1970 - 1996) Bernice Holton (Assistant, began 1970) Sylvia Price. (Assistant Warden, began 1976) Mary Morris (Warden)


Services: Medical: - Doctors: Dr Johnson, Dr. Beardmore, Dr Pook; - Nurses: Molly Miller, - Chiropodist / Podiatrist

Ministers: ( spiritual as well as social support) - Church: Canon Blake (did some conjuring tricks to entertain the folk at St Cadoc’s Court, Canon Gower, - Chapel: Brian Scott (1970 - 1974), Rev. D.G. Rhapps (1974-1983), Rev, Nigel Burge (1984-1989)

- View the brief youtube clip of St Cadoc’s Opening and Bus trip to Tintern Abbey


Thanks to Jean Langley for sharing the story of her life at St Cadoc's Court. For 26 years, Jean Langley was the Warden of St Cadoc’s Court. She loved her work which she defined as: ‘being a good neighbour’’. In those days, St Cadoc’s Court was more than a place to live — it was a family. These articles and stories have been donated by Jean Langley, Warden of St Cadoc's Court from its opening in her 26 years of service beginning in 1970.. Interview with Jean Langley, Sept, 2012 Jean is a Monmouth girl - moved there when she was 16 years of age. She married Brian and had three children: Marc, Jane and Ruth.

An employee of the Monmouth Rural District, she began her career at 'Trevor Bowen Court' in Monmouth. As her children were getting older she wanted to be home when they got home from school. With this in mind she applied to be the Warden of the new care home in Raglan, known as St Cadoc’s Court.

Three parts: St Cadoc's Court - sheltered housing. Bungalow's - Mary was the warden, Sylvia was 2 day deputy to Mary and 2 day deputy to Jean so they could take time off. Pensioners bungalow's - have a pull cord for emergencies but no warden. (two of these were for disabled people)

Extended family - didn't have their own telephones - so Jean knew what was happening and could keep on top of things. Jean collected everyone's pills and distributed them.

Given a list of people that would be moving in (they were selected by the County). The people needed to be pension age (over 60). But they did have two residents under 60 (they had medical problems). They had about 4 couples in the first batch. Some had cars and could get along.

Billy Cornfields mum - had cancer, was one of the first people there.

Doctor: Molly was the district nurse and had good contact with her. Dr Pook. His son married Jean's youngest daughter. Excellent doctor and a good bloke. He ran Kenvin Illa Nursing home with another doctor. First met him when Mark was born. Brians' mum had petty mals - he diagnosed it and gave her pills that kept it in control. When he was on his own he lived in the Crown and had his surgery there. Later he moved to the Manse after he was married (there wasn't a minister in the village at that time)- he had the Pantiles built and he and his wife' Beryl moved there and had their family. Hayley Wills granddaughter of Pooks married to Gareth - hoping to have her surgery for podiatry at the Pantiles.

Dr Johnson, w/ boy Peter. Was diagnosed with Cancer and had to leave the village. He was followed by Dr Beardmore. Jean retired when she was 60 years old - same year that Jane Downing came to Raglan. She had been Warden of St Cadoc’s Court for 26 years.

Ministers: CIW: Canon Blake. and Brian. Canon Blake lived at Malt House. He had the new vicarage built - built it upside down to take advantage of the views. He was married to a school teacher. She ran Mother's Union. Very nice man. He did some conjuring tricks to entertain the folk at St Cadoc's Court. After he was made Canon - he left the village. Canon Gower was the next one - he was a Batchelor. Always happy to help out. Rev Pugh retired here and Jimmy Collings-Wells (a lay reader who lived in the village). He was here for 15 years. Very supportive of St Cadoc's Court. First Sunday in the Month at 3pm had a service at St Cadoc's Court.

Baptists: On the third Sunday night each month the Baptists Chapel gave a service with Communion. Alwyn Jones was there when St Cadoc's opened. Brian Scott followed by Mr Derek Rhapps - fire and brimstone preacher. Nigel Burge (photo) he had been a teacher at the comp before he retired and went into the ministry, He and his wife lived in Usk. Then there was Ian Lovell. The ministers were all very supportive. They would come to visit and take part in social events.

Had a Chiropodist / Podiatrist - fish man, baker came around and library van.


2. 1971: Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony (JL32A / JL32B01) This is the sixth year that the Secretary of State has made awards to recognise recent housing designs of outstanding quality and to encourage a generally higher standard of design in Wales.

The original competition, which began in 1960 as a joint scheme for England and Wales, was in 1966 replaced by separate awards schemes for the two countries. The competition in Wales is promoted by the Welsh Office in collaboration with the Royal Institute of British Architects.

The Secretary of State has made the awards on the recommendation of an Swards Committee. The Chairman and one of the members of the Committee were nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects. The names of the members of the Community appear after the names of the successful entries.

Entries were invited in three categories: Residential development of or more dwellings carried out or commissioned by private developers

Schemes carried out or commissioned by local authorities, New Town development corporations or housing associations for” —

Residential development of 20 or more dwellings at a density of over 60 persons to the acre;

Residential development of 5 or more dwellings at a density of 60 persons and under to the acre;

In judging the entries, the Awards Committee considered not only the quality of design, external appearance, layout, landscaping and grouping of buildings, but also the quality of workmanship that went into actual building and the reactions of the people who lived in the houses.

The awards take the form of a medal and diploma for the architect, and diplomas for the client or authority who commissioned the scheme and for the builder or contractor who carried out the work. Diplomas are awarded also to the architect commissioner, and builder of each scheme commended by the Wards Committee. A special plaque is awarded to the commissioners of medal winning schemes for display on site.

The medals, struck by the Royal Mint, bear on the obverse the augmented Royal Badge of Wales. The reverse, which was designed by Christopher Ironside, carries a version of the proportional drawing of a man by Leonardo da Vinci; it symbolises the element of proportion in individuals and communities which designers and planners must serve

Commended Scheme: Higher density local authority schemes. St Cadoc’s Court, Auction Field, raglan

24 old persons flats with communal lounge and warden’s dwelling at a density of 81 persons to the acre. Designed by: Authur T Beer of Owen Luder Partnership, Newport. Built by: David Attwell & Richardson, Newport, Commissioned by: Monmouth Rural District Council


3. 1971, Article: St Cadoc's Court. District Councils Review, Vol one, Sept 1972, JL33A District Councils Review. September, 1972 p. 238, 239

the finest of the district’s projects for pensioner-residents is St.Cadoc’s Court. In the dying winter light we first drove through the winding road of Llandenny itself, passing the fine mainly 15th century parish church, and remembering the civil war siege of raglanCastle, when Cefntilla Court, built in 1919 on the edge of Llandenny, was used as the headquarters of the Parliament’s army.

Very soon we were on the outskirts of Raglan itself and the welcoming lights of St. Cadoc’s Court, with the surrounding still expanding, R.D.C. housing estate — which will eventually contain 15 three-bedroomed houses, 34 two bedroomed houses, 20 bungalows, together with garages — a neighbourhood of equally fine architecture.

Architect both for the housing estate and for the prize-winning grouped dwelling scheme for the elderly was Arthur T. Beer, B.Arch., A.R.I.B.A., of Newport. Undoubtedly it is Mr. Beer’s flair for design combined with the tremendous zest of the warden, Mrs. Jean Langley, and her family for this work that are principally the secret of St Cadoc’s success. Mrs. Langley’s husband, who works with disabled people for the county council, their two daughters and even her sister-in-law and her children all play their part in helping her to run St. Cadoc’s Court. The Round Table and local school children take a practical interest, too.

There are 23 flats in the scheme. Each of the seven single flats has a small hall, an individual toilet with a W.C., and a washbasin a bed-sitting room, and a ‘galley-kitchen” with cooker, sink, cupboard space, working area and small refrigerator. The 16 two-person flats have separate living rooms and bedrooms.

Bathrooms and showers are available, with aids for residents with such handicaps as arthritis and lumbago.

A riot of pot plants thrive in the hallway, corridors, sitting-out areas and residents’ own homes, and are meticulously cared-for. The pleasure of the warden, her husband and the tenants in plants is also reflected in the garden where flower-beds, trees and shrubs, set off by a paved loggia and miniature lawn, are rich with colour in season. Thoughtfully a sliding door has been provided leading directly from the communal lounge into the garden, while the loggia gives shade on sunny days. A number of bench seats have also been placed in the garden.

The communal lounge has a very find landscape by local artist Joan barnes over the pleasant open fire. yet another touch of home is a display cabinet where Mrs. Langley has encouraged each tenant to place one personal ornament, not only as a reminder of this or her past life when sitting in the lounge, but as a link with the present.

Theres is a good selection of books on the shelves, some permanent gifts to St. Cadoc’s Court. In addition the county library services send their mobile fan. A proportion of Ulverscroft large size publications are included for those with poor sight.

There is a footpath from St. Cadoc’s to the village shops at Raglan.

A coffee morning organised to raise money for outings and other social occasions for residents had earned £120 — a superb effort by the warden, her family, and the residents alike. This had helped to take tenants on such coach trips in the summer as a tour of the Wye Valley with tea.

One of the oldest tenants, Mrs. Powell, at 90 is already, a great-great-grandmother. While we were at St. Cadoc’s two visitors arrived for her — a grand-daughter and her toddler — Mrs. Powell’s great great grandson, wobbling along the gleaming tiled ground floor corridor in an excess of energy to find her front-door. Minutes later, one of Mrs. Langley’s daughters came in breezily from school. It was good to see this young life enlivening St Cadoc’s.

As we bade goodbye to St. Cadoc’s, the warmth and kindliness of its atmosphere travelled out into the winter twilight, the glow of the entrance hall symbolising the welcome within.

———— 4. 1971 , News clippings re St Cadoc's Court. Good neighbour family, Tributes to Warden, Awards for Gwent housing, congratulations. JL34 Good Neighbour family

A good neighbour — that’s how Mrs. Jean Langley sees herself, but there is a difference. She is warden of St. Cadoc’s Court, raglan, ad her neighbours are twenty seven old people.

But, although her title smacks of officialdom, Mrs. Langley stresses that she is living with the elderly residents to help them with problems and pop in, occasionally to make sure they are well and happy.

“This is not an old people’s home,” she said. “We have 16 one-bedroomed flats and seven bed-sitters, which the old people rent from the council. They are all self-contained. Each tenant brings their own furniture and possessions, and although they are within easy reach of help and friends, they can keep their own privacy.”

Mrs. Langley, her husband Brian, and their three children, jane 12, Mark eleven and Ruth nine, live in the same building as the old folk, and all work together in an effort to create a friendly atmosphere.

WELFARE

Mr Langley, who works for the welfare department of Monmouthshire County Council has been doing the gardening since the development was opened in April 1970. The children have given concerts for the residents and have proved to be great favourites with them.

Mrs. Langley is always on call. “In every flatlet, there is an alarm button by the bed, which when pressed rings a bell in my office, or at night in our bedroom.

“This is just in case of emergency, such as if someone is ill, we then call the doctor. So far nothing has happened except that one lady got stuck in the bath and needed a bit of a hand.”

The ages of the tenants of St. Cadoc’s Court, vary from fifty to ninety. The oldest is aged 91 and Mrs. Langley tells me that she is extremely active.

“This accommodation is the step between their own home and an old people’s home.” she said. “Sent to a home, a person often ages much quicker when among the infirm. This council scheme is for those who are capable of looking after themselves. As soon as they need permanent help, they are transferred.”

At St. cadoc’s Court, the tenants have the use of the laundrette, leisure rooms and a large garden. For those who would rather shop at home, a mobile serve visits the court and church services are held frequently.

We don’t organise anyone,” said Mrs. Langley, “Most people prefer to watch their own television sets in the evening or to visit each other I am only here to help with any problems they may have; for example there has been a bit of difficulty with decimalisation and getting long distance calls on the telephone.”

One of the residents takes over on Mrs. Langley’s free days, and the alarm system is transferred to her room. But Mrs. Langley’s dedication extends further than the bounds of duty.

PARTY

“We held a coffee morning and raised £136. With that, we gave the old people a Christmas party, a dinner and entertainment. With what else we have in the fund, we intend to take them all out when the weather is warmer.”

The Langley family are all enthusiastic and personally involved at St. Cadoc’s Court. they have instilled just the right amount of spirit and friendship into an excellent scheme

(Vicky Lewis)

St Cadoc's Court

For 26 years, Jean Langley was the Warden of St Cadoc’s Court. She loved her work which she defined as: ‘being a good neighbour’’. In those days, St Cadoc’s Court was more than a place to live — it was a family. These articles and stories have been donated by Jean Langley, Warden of St Cadoc's Court from its opening in her 26 years of service beginning in 1970


ALSO see: - Raglanpedia: Jean Langley Warden of St Cadoc's Court, and - Flickr raglan_history , St Cadoc's Court - youtube - St Cadoc’s Opening and Bus trip to Tintern Abbey


1. Interview with Jean Langley, Sept, 2012 Jean is a Monmouth girl - moved there when she was 16 years of age. She married Brian and had three children: Marc, Jane and Ruth

An employee of the Monmouth Rural District, she began her career at 'Trevor Bowen Court' in Monmouth.

As her children were getting older she wanted to be home when they got home from school. With this in mind she applied to be the Warden of the new care home in Raglan, known as St Cadoc’s Court.

Three parts: St Cadoc's Court - sheltered housing. Bungalow's - Mary was the warden, Sylvia was 2 day deputy to Mary and 2 day deputy to Jean so they could take time off. Pensioners bungalow's - have a pull cord for emergencies but no warden. (two of these were for disabled people)

Extended family - didn't have their own telephones - so Jean knew what was happening and could keep on top of things. Jean collected everyone's pills and distributed them.

Given a list of people that would be moving in (they were selected by the County). The people needed to be pension age (over 60). But they did have two residents under 60 (they had medical problems). They had about 4 couples in the first batch. Some had cars and could get along.

Billy Cornfields mum - had cancer, was one of the first people there.

Doctor: Molly was the district nurse and had good contact with her. Dr Pook. His son married Jean's youngest daughter. Excellent doctor and a good bloke. He ran Kenvin Illa Nursing home with another doctor. First met him when Mark was born. Brians' mum had petty mals - he diagnosed it and gave her pills that kept it in control. When he was on his own he lived in the Crown and had his surgery there. Later he moved to the Manse after he was married (there wasn't a minister in the village at that time)- he had the Pantiles built and he and his wife' Beryl moved there and had their family. Hayley Wills granddaughter of Pooks married to Gareth - hoping to have her surgery for podiatry at the Pantiles.

Dr Johnson, w/ boy Peter. Was diagnosed with Cancer and had to leave the village. He was followed by Dr Beardmore. Jean retired when she was 60 years old - same year that Jane Downing came to Raglan. She had been Warden of St Cadoc’s Court for 26 years.

Ministers: CIW: Canon Blake. and Brian. Canon Blake lived at Malt House. He had the new vicarage built - built it upside down to take advantage of the views. He was married to a school teacher. She ran Mother's Union. Very nice man. He did some conjuring tricks to entertain the folk at St Cadoc's Court. After he was made Canon - he left the village. Canon Gower was the next one - he was a Batchelor. Always happy to help out. Rev Pugh retired here and Jimmy Collings-Wells (a lay reader who lived in the village). He was here for 15 years. Very supportive of St Cadoc's Court. First Sunday in the Month at 3pm had a service at St Cadoc's Court.

Baptists: On the third Sunday night each month the Baptists Chapel gave a service with Communion. Alwyn Jones was there when St Cadoc's opened. Brian Scott followed by Mr Derek Rhapps - fire and brimstone preacher. Nigel Burge (photo) he had been a teacher at the comp before he retired and went into the ministry, He and his wife lived in Usk. Then there was Ian Lovell. The ministers were all very supportive. They would come to visit and take part in social events.

Had a Chiropodist / Podiatrist - fish man, baker came around and library van. —————— 2. 1971: Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony (JL32A / JL32B01) This is the sixth year that the Secretary of State has made awards to recognise recent housing designs of outstanding quality and to encourage a generally higher standard of design in Wales.

The original competition, which began in 1960 as a joint scheme for England and Wales, was in 1966 replaced by separate awards schemes for the two countries. The competition in Wales is promoted by the Welsh Office in collaboration with the Royal Institute of British Architects.

The Secretary of State has made the awards on the recommendation of an Swards Committee. The Chairman and one of the members of the Committee were nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects. The names of the members of the Community appear after the names of the successful entries.

Entries were invited in three categories: Residential development of or more dwellings carried out or commissioned by private developers

Schemes carried out or commissioned by local authorities, New Town development corporations or housing associations for” —

Residential development of 20 or more dwellings at a density of over 60 persons to the acre;

Residential development of 5 or more dwellings at a density of 60 persons and under to the acre;

In judging the entries, the Awards Committee considered not only the quality of design, external appearance, layout, landscaping and grouping of buildings, but also the quality of workmanship that went into actual building and the reactions of the people who lived in the houses.

The awards take the form of a medal and diploma for the architect, and diplomas for the client or authority who commissioned the scheme and for the builder or contractor who carried out the work. Diplomas are awarded also to the architect commissioner, and builder of each scheme commended by the Wards Committee. A special plaque is awarded to the commissioners of medal winning schemes for display on site.

The medals, struck by the Royal Mint, bear on the obverse the augmented Royal Badge of Wales. The reverse, which was designed by Christopher Ironside, carries a version of the proportional drawing of a man by Leonardo da Vinci; it symbolises the element of proportion in individuals and communities which designers and planners must serve

Commended Scheme: Higher density local authority schemes. St Cadoc’s Court, Auction Field, raglan

24 old persons flats with communal lounge and warden’s dwelling at a density of 81 persons to the acre. Designed by: Authur T Beer of Owen Luder Partnership, Newport. Built by: David Attwell & Richardson, Newport, Commissioned by: Monmouth Rural District Council

———— 3. 1971, Article: St Cadoc's Court. District Councils Review, Vol one, Sept 1972, JL33A District Councils Review. September, 1972 p. 238, 239

… the finest of the district’s projects for pensioner-residents is St.Cadoc’s Court. In the dying winter light we first drove through the winding road of Llandenny itself, passing the fine mainly 15th century parish church, and remembering the civil war siege of raglanCastle, when Cefntilla Court, built in 1919 on the edge of Llandenny, was used as the headquarters of the Parliament’s army.

Very soon we were on the outskirts of Raglan itself and the welcoming lights of St. Cadoc’s Court, with the surrounding still expanding, R.D.C. housing estate — which will eventually contain 15 three-bedroomed houses, 34 two bedroomed houses, 20 bungalows, together with garages — a neighbourhood of equally fine architecture.

Architect both for the housing estate and for the prize-winning grouped dwelling scheme for the elderly was Arthur T. Beer, B.Arch., A.R.I.B.A., of Newport. Undoubtedly it is Mr. Beer’s flair for design combined with the tremendous zest of the warden, Mrs. Jean Langley, and her family for this work that are principally the secret of St Cadoc’s success. Mrs. Langley’s husband, who works with disabled people for the county council, their two daughters and even her sister-in-law and her children all play their part in helping her to run St. Cadoc’s Court. The Round Table and local school children take a practical interest, too.

There are 23 flats in the scheme. Each of the seven single flats has a small hall, an individual toilet with a W.C., and a washbasin a bed-sitting room, and a ‘galley-kitchen” with cooker, sink, cupboard space, working area and small refrigerator. The 16 two-person flats have separate living rooms and bedrooms.

Bathrooms and showers are available, with aids for residents with such handicaps as arthritis and lumbago.

A riot of pot plants thrive in the hallway, corridors, sitting-out areas and residents’ own homes, and are meticulously cared-for. The pleasure of the warden, her husband and the tenants in plants is also reflected in the garden where flower-beds, trees and shrubs, set off by a paved loggia and miniature lawn, are rich with colour in season. Thoughtfully a sliding door has been provided leading directly from the communal lounge into the garden, while the loggia gives shade on sunny days. A number of bench seats have also been placed in the garden.

The communal lounge has a very find landscape by local artist Joan barnes over the pleasant open fire. yet another touch of home is a display cabinet where Mrs. Langley has encouraged each tenant to place one personal ornament, not only as a reminder of this or her past life when sitting in the lounge, but as a link with the present.

theres is a good selection of books on the shelves, some permanent gifts to St. Cadoc’s Court. In addition the county library services send their mobile fan. A proportion of Ulverscroft large size publications are included for those with poor sight.

There is a footpath from St. Cadoc’s to the village shops at Raglan.

A coffee morning organised to raise money for outings and other social occasions for residents had earned £120 — a superb effort by the warden, her family, and the residents alike. This had helped to take tenants on such coach trips in the summer as a tour of the Wye Valley with tea.

One of the oldest tenants, Mrs. Powell, at 90 is already, a great-great-grandmother. While we were at St. Cadoc’s two visitors arrived for her — a grand-daughter and her toddler — Mrs. Powell’s great great grandson, wobbling along the gleaming tiled ground floor corridor in an excess of energy to find her front-door. Minutes later, one of Mrs. Langley’s daughters came in breezily from school. It was good to see this young life enlivening St Cadoc’s.

As we bade goodbye to St. Cadoc’s, the warmth and kindliness of its atmosphere travelled out into the winter twilight, the glow of the entrance hall symbolising the welcome within.

———— 4. 1971 , News clippings re St Cadoc's Court. Good neighbour family, Tributes to Warden, Awards for Gwent housing, congratulations. JL34

Good Neighbour family

A good neighbour — that’s how Mrs. Jean Langley sees herself, but there is a difference. She is warden of St. Cadoc’s Court, raglan, ad her neighbours are twenty seven old people.

But, although her title smacks of officialdom, Mrs. Langley stresses that she is living with the elderly residents to help them with problems and pop in, occasionally to make sure they are well and happy.

“This is not an old people’s home,” she said. “We have 16 one-bedroomed flats and seven bed-sitters, which the old people rent from the council. They are all self-contained. Each tenant brings their own furniture and possessions, and although they are within easy reach of help and friends, they can keep their own privacy.”

Mrs. Langley, her husband Brian, and their three children, jane 12, Mark eleven and Ruth nine, live in the same building as the old folk, and all work together in an effort to create a friendly atmosphere.

WELFARE

Mr Langley, who works for the welfare department of Monmouthshire County Council has been doing the gardening since the development was opened in April 1970. The children have given concerts for the residents and have proved to be great favourites with them.

Mrs. Langley is always on call. “In every flatlet, there is an alarm button by the bed, which when pressed rings a bell in my office, or at night in our bedroom.

“This is just in case of emergency, such as if someone is ill, we then call the doctor. So far nothing has happened except that one lady got stuck in the bath and needed a bit of a hand.”

The ages of the tenants of St. Cadoc’s Court, vary from fifty to ninety. The oldest is aged 91 and Mrs. Langley tells me that she is extremely active.

“This accommodation is the step between their own home and an old people’s home.” she said. “Sent to a home, a person often ages much quicker when among the infirm. This council scheme is for those who are capable of looking after themselves. As soon as they need permanent help, they are transferred.”

At St. cadoc’s Court, the tenants have the use of the laundrette, leisure rooms and a large garden. For those who would rather shop at home, a mobile serve visits the court and church services are held frequently.

We don’t organise anyone,” said Mrs. Langley, “Most people prefer to watch their own television sets in the evening or to visit each other I am only here to help with any problems they may have; for example there has been a bit of difficulty with decimalisation and getting long distance calls on the telephone.”

One of the residents takes over on Mrs. Langley’s free days, and the alarm system is transferred to her room. But Mrs. Langley’s dedication extends further than the bounds of duty.

PARTY

“We held a coffee morning and raised £136. With that, we gave the old people a Christmas party, a dinner and entertainment. With what else we have in the fund, we intend to take them all out when the weather is warmer.”

The Langley family are all enthusiastic and personally involved at St. Cadoc’s Court. they have instilled just the right amount of spirit and friendship into an excellent scheme

(Vicky Lewis)

— 1971 - News clippings re St Cadoc's Court. Good neighbour family, Tributes to Warden, Awards for Gwent housing, congratulations. JL34

TRIBUTES TO WARDEN

Tributes to Mrs. Langley, warden of the old people’s flatlets at St. Cadoc’s Court, Raglan, were paid at the monthly meeting of Monmouth Rural District Council on Friday.

Recently the flatlets won a ‘Highly Commended’ award for good design in housing and this was presented at a ceremony in Cardiff Castle by the Minister of State, Welsh Office (Mr. David Gibson-Watt). the Chairman of the Council (Coun. B. P. Rogers) told the council that the assessors of the scheme had been mightily pleased” with the flatlets and also with the way theory were run. He thought much of the credit for this was due to Mrs. Langley. “She has been a trump to us in getting this scheme off the ground,” he said.

It was agreed an official letter of thanks be sent to Mrs. langley who was present at the Cardiff ceremony, together with the Chairman, Coun. B. M. Cowles, and Mr. P. A. Thomas, the council’s Surveyor

————

1971 - Letter from Welsh Office regarding 1971 Houseing Medal Competition - JL35

Letter from Welsh Office, Cardiff Ref: H 188/70

15 November 1971

Mrs Jean Langley, St Cadoc Court, Auctin Field, Raglan, Mon.

Dear Mrs Langley You will be aware that the St Cadoc’s Flatlets scheme was entered in the 1971 Housing medal Competition. The Housing Awards Committee have recommended that the scheme be highly commended and the Secretary of State has accepted this recommendation.

You will be pleased to know that in their report the Committee referred to you in the following terms:

“The tenants, aged between 60-90 years, look after themselves but are supervised by a most charming, efficient and helpful lady Warden (with part-time help from her husband) who keeps this well run building superbly clean.”

The presentation of the various awards is to be made by the Secretary of State at Cardiff Castle on the evening of 26 November. I enclose an official invitation to you and your husband to attend the ceremony and we should be pleased to see you both if this is convenient. After the formal proceedings the guests move to the Library at the Castle for buffet refreshments and disperse between 9 and 9.30 pm

Yours, sincerely, B. Roberts (Miss), Committee Secretary

— 1970 - Haven of rest in new Flatlets, Newspaper article - JO36

HAVEN OF REST IN NEW FLATLETS

by Griffith Williams

Mr. Edward Rowlands, Under-Secretary of State for Wales, last Friday formally opened 23 flatlets for old age pensioners at St. Cadoc’s Court, raglan, under a development scheme by Monmouth Rural Council.

The St. Cadoc’s Court concept is an interesting and imaginative one, planned and bolt with the welfare of the elderly in mind.

It amounted to a five years’ contract worth £60,000, carried out by the Newport firm of David Atwell and Richardson, joiners and building contractors, of 50a London Street, as the general contractors.

The architect is Arthur T. Beer, now a partner in the Owen Luder Partnership, with offices at New port, London, Harrogate, newcastle, and an associated office in Brussels.

Provided in the present scheme of flatlets at St. Cadoc’s Court, 17 of which are already occupied, is the warden’s accommodation.

Each flatlet has a small hall, toilet with washbasin and w.e., galley kitchen and living space. The two-person flats have separate living rooms and bedrooms, but the ‘batchelor’ flats have combined bedsitters.

In addition to this there are bathrooms and showers distributed throughout the building which can be used as required and for the convenience of the occupants.

The building also has a communal lounge with an open fire and several sitting / reading areas as well as a communal laundry room.

Each flatlet is completely self-contained, with the tenant having his or her own front door keys both for their premises and for the building as a whole.

I understand that there is no need for anyone living in the building to feel lonely at any time, as some recreational activities can be arranged an both the lounge and reading areas are available at all times for everyone to use if only to get together for a chat.

Approaches are being made to have meals on wheels, hairdressing, chiropody and library services visit the building and the lounge will also be available for religious services.

So far, five of the elderly residents at St. Cadoc’s Court are over 80 years of age. The senior being an 89 year old woman.

Ages themselves extend over quite a wide bracket of years from 63 upwards and all residents are local i the sense that they come from within a radius of 20 miles.

In June, when MonmouthRural Council ask for tenders for 22 new dwellings, two of this number will be required to be designed specially for disabled persons.

This will include special hand-rails with other facilities and perhaps the use of showers instead of baths for the residents.

The county welfare officer will assist in the design of the new quarters.

————

St Cadoc's Court For 26 years, Jean Langley was the Warden of St Cadoc’s Court. She loved her work which she defined as: ‘being a good neighbour’’. In those days, St Cadoc’s Court was more than a place to live — it was a family. These articles and stories have been donated by Jean Langley, Warden of St Cadoc's Court from its opening in her 26 years of service beginning in 1970

ALSO see: - Flickr raglan_history , St Cadoc's Court - youtube - St Cadoc’s Opening and Bus trip to Tintern Abbey


1. Interview with Jean Langley, Sept, 2012 Jean is a Monmouth girl - moved there when she was 16 years of age. She married Brian and had three children: Marc, Jane and Ruth

An employee of the Monmouth Rural District, she began her career at 'Trevor Bowen Court' in Monmouth.

As her children were getting older she wanted to be home when they got home from school. With this in mind she applied to be the Warden of the new care home in Raglan, known as St Cadoc’s Court.

Three parts: St Cadoc's Court - sheltered housing. Bungalow's - Mary was the warden, Sylvia was 2 day deputy to Mary and 2 day deputy to Jean so they could take time off. Pensioners bungalow's - have a pull cord for emergencies but no warden. (two of these were for disabled people)

Extended family - didn't have their own telephones - so Jean knew what was happening and could keep on top of things. Jean collected everyone's pills and distributed them.

Given a list of people that would be moving in (they were selected by the County). The people needed to be pension age (over 60). But they did have two residents under 60 (they had medical problems). They had about 4 couples in the first batch. Some had cars and could get along.

Billy Cornfields mum - had cancer, was one of the first people there.

Doctor: Molly was the district nurse and had good contact with her. Dr Pook. His son married Jean's youngest daughter. Excellent doctor and a good bloke. He ran Kenvin Illa Nursing home with another doctor. First met him when Mark was born. Brians' mum had petty mals - he diagnosed it and gave her pills that kept it in control. When he was on his own he lived in the Crown and had his surgery there. Later he moved to the Manse after he was married (there wasn't a minister in the village at that time)- he had the Pantiles built and he and his wife' Beryl moved there and had their family. Hayley Wills granddaughter of Pooks married to Gareth - hoping to have her surgery for podiatry at the Pantiles.

Dr Johnson, w/ boy Peter. Was diagnosed with Cancer and had to leave the village. He was followed by Dr Beardmore. Jean retired when she was 60 years old - same year that Jane Downing came to Raglan. She had been Warden of St Cadoc’s Court for 26 years.

Ministers: CIW: Canon Blake. and Brian. Canon Blake lived at Malt House. He had the new vicarage built - built it upside down to take advantage of the views. He was married to a school teacher. She ran Mother's Union. Very nice man. He did some conjuring tricks to entertain the folk at St Cadoc's Court. After he was made Canon - he left the village. Canon Gower was the next one - he was a Batchelor. Always happy to help out. Rev Pugh retired here and Jimmy Collings-Wells (a lay reader who lived in the village). He was here for 15 years. Very supportive of St Cadoc's Court. First Sunday in the Month at 3pm had a service at St Cadoc's Court.

Baptists: On the third Sunday night each month the Baptists Chapel gave a service with Communion. Alwyn Jones was there when St Cadoc's opened. Brian Scott followed by Mr Derek Rhapps - fire and brimstone preacher. Nigel Burge (photo) he had been a teacher at the comp before he retired and went into the ministry, He and his wife lived in Usk. Then there was Ian Lovell. The ministers were all very supportive. They would come to visit and take part in social events.

Had a Chiropodist / Podiatrist - fish man, baker came around and library van. —————— 2. 1971: Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony (JL32A / JL32B01) This is the sixth year that the Secretary of State has made awards to recognise recent housing designs of outstanding quality and to encourage a generally higher standard of design in Wales.

The original competition, which began in 1960 as a joint scheme for England and Wales, was in 1966 replaced by separate awards schemes for the two countries. The competition in Wales is promoted by the Welsh Office in collaboration with the Royal Institute of British Architects.

The Secretary of State has made the awards on the recommendation of an Swards Committee. The Chairman and one of the members of the Committee were nominated by the Royal Institute of British Architects. The names of the members of the Community appear after the names of the successful entries.

Entries were invited in three categories: Residential development of or more dwellings carried out or commissioned by private developers

Schemes carried out or commissioned by local authorities, New Town development corporations or housing associations for” —

Residential development of 20 or more dwellings at a density of over 60 persons to the acre;

Residential development of 5 or more dwellings at a density of 60 persons and under to the acre;

In judging the entries, the Awards Committee considered not only the quality of design, external appearance, layout, landscaping and grouping of buildings, but also the quality of workmanship that went into actual building and the reactions of the people who lived in the houses.

The awards take the form of a medal and diploma for the architect, and diplomas for the client or authority who commissioned the scheme and for the builder or contractor who carried out the work. Diplomas are awarded also to the architect commissioner, and builder of each scheme commended by the Wards Committee. A special plaque is awarded to the commissioners of medal winning schemes for display on site.

The medals, struck by the Royal Mint, bear on the obverse the augmented Royal Badge of Wales. The reverse, which was designed by Christopher Ironside, carries a version of the proportional drawing of a man by Leonardo da Vinci; it symbolises the element of proportion in individuals and communities which designers and planners must serve

Commended Scheme: Higher density local authority schemes. St Cadoc’s Court, Auction Field, raglan

24 old persons flats with communal lounge and warden’s dwelling at a density of 81 persons to the acre. Designed by: Authur T Beer of Owen Luder Partnership, Newport. Built by: David Attwell & Richardson, Newport, Commissioned by: Monmouth Rural District Council

———— 3. 1971, Article: St Cadoc's Court. District Councils Review, Vol one, Sept 1972, JL33A District Councils Review. September, 1972 p. 238, 239

… the finest of the district’s projects for pensioner-residents is St.Cadoc’s Court. In the dying winter light we first drove through the winding road of Llandenny itself, passing the fine mainly 15th century parish church, and remembering the civil war siege of raglanCastle, when Cefntilla Court, built in 1919 on the edge of Llandenny, was used as the headquarters of the Parliament’s army.

Very soon we were on the outskirts of Raglan itself and the welcoming lights of St. Cadoc’s Court, with the surrounding still expanding, R.D.C. housing estate — which will eventually contain 15 three-bedroomed houses, 34 two bedroomed houses, 20 bungalows, together with garages — a neighbourhood of equally fine architecture.

Architect both for the housing estate and for the prize-winning grouped dwelling scheme for the elderly was Arthur T. Beer, B.Arch., A.R.I.B.A., of Newport. Undoubtedly it is Mr. Beer’s flair for design combined with the tremendous zest of the warden, Mrs. Jean Langley, and her family for this work that are principally the secret of St Cadoc’s success. Mrs. Langley’s husband, who works with disabled people for the county council, their two daughters and even her sister-in-law and her children all play their part in helping her to run St. Cadoc’s Court. The Round Table and local school children take a practical interest, too.

There are 23 flats in the scheme. Each of the seven single flats has a small hall, an individual toilet with a W.C., and a washbasin a bed-sitting room, and a ‘galley-kitchen” with cooker, sink, cupboard space, working area and small refrigerator. The 16 two-person flats have separate living rooms and bedrooms.

Bathrooms and showers are available, with aids for residents with such handicaps as arthritis and lumbago.

A riot of pot plants thrive in the hallway, corridors, sitting-out areas and residents’ own homes, and are meticulously cared-for. The pleasure of the warden, her husband and the tenants in plants is also reflected in the garden where flower-beds, trees and shrubs, set off by a paved loggia and miniature lawn, are rich with colour in season. Thoughtfully a sliding door has been provided leading directly from the communal lounge into the garden, while the loggia gives shade on sunny days. A number of bench seats have also been placed in the garden.

The communal lounge has a very find landscape by local artist Joan barnes over the pleasant open fire. yet another touch of home is a display cabinet where Mrs. Langley has encouraged each tenant to place one personal ornament, not only as a reminder of this or her past life when sitting in the lounge, but as a link with the present.

There is a good selection of books on the shelves, some permanent gifts to St. Cadoc’s Court. In addition the county library services send their mobile fan. A proportion of Ulverscroft large size publications are included for those with poor sight.

There is a footpath from St. Cadoc’s to the village shops at Raglan.

A coffee morning organised to raise money for outings and other social occasions for residents had earned £120 — a superb effort by the warden, her family, and the residents alike. This had helped to take tenants on such coach trips in the summer as a tour of the Wye Valley with tea.

One of the oldest tenants, Mrs. Powell, at 90 is already, a great-great-grandmother. While we were at St. Cadoc’s two visitors arrived for her — a grand-daughter and her toddler — Mrs. Powell’s great great grandson, wobbling along the gleaming tiled ground floor corridor in an excess of energy to find her front-door. Minutes later, one of Mrs. Langley’s daughters came in breezily from school. It was good to see this young life enlivening St Cadoc’s.

As we bade goodbye to St. Cadoc’s, the warmth and kindliness of its atmosphere travelled out into the winter twilight, the glow of the entrance hall symbolising the welcome within.

———— 4. 1971 , News clippings re St Cadoc's Court. Good neighbour family, Tributes to Warden, Awards for Gwent housing, congratulations. JL34

Good Neighbour family

A good neighbour — that’s how Mrs. Jean Langley sees herself, but there is a difference. She is warden of St. Cadoc’s Court, raglan, ad her neighbours are twenty seven old people.

But, although her title smacks of officialdom, Mrs. Langley stresses that she is living with the elderly residents to help them with problems and pop in, occasionally to make sure they are well and happy.

“This is not an old people’s home,” she said. “We have 16 one-bedroomed flats and seven bed-sitters, which the old people rent from the council. They are all self-contained. Each tenant brings their own furniture and possessions, and although they are within easy reach of help and friends, they can keep their own privacy.”

Mrs. Langley, her husband Brian, and their three children, jane 12, Mark eleven and Ruth nine, live in the same building as the old folk, and all work together in an effort to create a friendly atmosphere.

WELFARE

Mr Langley, who works for the welfare department of Monmouthshire County Council has been doing the gardening since the development was opened in April 1970. The children have given concerts for the residents and have proved to be great favourites with them.

Mrs. Langley is always on call. “In every flatlet, there is an alarm button by the bed, which when pressed rings a bell in my office, or at night in our bedroom.

“This is just in case of emergency, such as if someone is ill, we then call the doctor. So far nothing has happened except that one lady got stuck in the bath and needed a bit of a hand.”

The ages of the tenants of St. Cadoc’s Court, vary from fifty to ninety. The oldest is aged 91 and Mrs. Langley tells me that she is extremely active.

“This accommodation is the step between their own home and an old people’s home.” she said. “Sent to a home, a person often ages much quicker when among the infirm. This council scheme is for those who are capable of looking after themselves. As soon as they need permanent help, they are transferred.”

At St. cadoc’s Court, the tenants have the use of the laundrette, leisure rooms and a large garden. For those who would rather shop at home, a mobile serve visits the court and church services are held frequently.

We don’t organise anyone,” said Mrs. Langley, “Most people prefer to watch their own television sets in the evening or to visit each other I am only here to help with any problems they may have; for example there has been a bit of difficulty with decimalisation and getting long distance calls on the telephone.”

One of the residents takes over on Mrs. Langley’s free days, and the alarm system is transferred to her room. But Mrs. Langley’s dedication extends further than the bounds of duty.

PARTY

“We held a coffee morning and raised £136. With that, we gave the old people a Christmas party, a dinner and entertainment. With what else we have in the fund, we intend to take them all out when the weather is warmer.”

The Langley family are all enthusiastic and personally involved at St. Cadoc’s Court. they have instilled just the right amount of spirit and friendship into an excellent scheme

(Vicky Lewis)

— 1971 - News clippings re St Cadoc's Court. Good neighbour family, Tributes to Warden, Awards for Gwent housing, congratulations. JL34

TRIBUTES TO WARDEN

Tributes to Mrs. Langley, warden of the old people’s flatlets at St. Cadoc’s Court, Raglan, were paid at the monthly meeting of Monmouth Rural District Council on Friday.

Recently the flatlets won a ‘Highly Commended’ award for good design in housing and this was presented at a ceremony in Cardiff Castle by the Minister of State, Welsh Office (Mr. David Gibson-Watt). the Chairman of the Council (Coun. B. P. Rogers) told the council that the assessors of the scheme had been mightily pleased” with the flatlets and also with the way theory were run. He thought much of the credit for this was due to Mrs. Langley. “She has been a trump to us in getting this scheme off the ground,” he said.

It was agreed an official letter of thanks be sent to Mrs. langley who was present at the Cardiff ceremony, together with the Chairman, Coun. B. M. Cowles, and Mr. P. A. Thomas, the council’s Surveyor

————

1971 - Letter from Welsh Office regarding 1971 Houseing Medal Competition - JL35

Letter from Welsh Office, Cardiff Ref: H 188/70

15 November 1971

Mrs Jean Langley, St Cadoc Court, Auctin Field, Raglan, Mon.

Dear Mrs Langley

You will be aware that the St Cadoc’s Flatlets scheme was entered in the 1971 Housing medal Competition. The Housing Awards Committee have recommended that the scheme be highly commended and the Secretary of State has accepted this recommendation.

You will be pleased to know that in their report the Committee referred to you in the following terms:

“The tenants, aged between 60-90 years, look after themselves but are supervised by a most charming, efficient and helpful lady Warden (with part-time help from her husband) who keeps this well run building superbly clean.”

The presentation of the various awards is to be made by the Secretary of State at Cardiff Castle on the evening of 26 November. I enclose an official invitation to you and your husband to attend the ceremony and we should be pleased to see you both if this is convenient. After the formal proceedings the guests move to the Library at the Castle for buffet refreshments and disperse between 9 and 9.30 pm

Yours, sincerely, B. Roberts (Miss), Committee Secretary

1970 - Haven of rest in new Flatlets, Newspaper article - JO36

HAVEN OF REST IN NEW FLATLETS

by Griffith Williams

Mr. Edward Rowlands, Under-Secretary of State for Wales, last Friday formally opened 23 flatlets for old age pensioners at St. Cadoc’s Court, raglan, under a development scheme by Monmouth Rural Council.

The St. Cadoc’s Court concept is an interesting and imaginative one, planned and bolt with the welfare of the elderly in mind.

It amounted to a five years’ contract worth £60,000, carried out by the Newport firm of David Atwell and Richardson, joiners and building contractors, of 50a London Street, as the general contractors.

The architect is Arthur T. Beer, now a partner in the Owen Luder Partnership, with offices at New port, London, Harrogate, newcastle, and an associated office in Brussels.

Provided in the present scheme of flatlets at St. Cadoc’s Court, 17 of which are already occupied, is the warden’s accommodation.

Each flatlet has a small hall, toilet with washbasin and w.e., galley kitchen and living space. The two-person flats have separate living rooms and bedrooms, but the ‘batchelor’ flats have combined bedsitters.

In addition to this there are bathrooms and showers distributed throughout the building which can be used as required and for the convenience of the occupants.

The building also has a communal lounge with an open fire and several sitting / reading areas as well as a communal laundry room.

Each flatlet is completely self-contained, with the tenant having his or her own front door keys both for their premises and for the building as a whole.

I understand that there is no need for anyone living in the building to feel lonely at any time, as some recreational activities can be arranged an both the lounge and reading areas are available at all times for everyone to use if only to get together for a chat.

Approaches are being made to have meals on wheels, hairdressing, chiropody and library services visit the building and the lounge will also be available for religious services.

So far, five of the elderly residents at St. Cadoc’s Court are over 80 years of age. The senior being an 89 year old woman.

Ages themselves extend over quite a wide bracket of years from 63 upwards and all residents are local i the sense that they come from within a radius of 20 miles.

In June, when MonmouthRural Council ask for tenders for 22 new dwellings, two of this number will be required to be designed specially for disabled persons.

This will include special hand-rails with other facilities and perhaps the use of showers instead of baths for the residents.

The county welfare officer will assist in the design of the new quarters.

———— 1970 - £80,000 Flatlets block for elderly opened at Raglan. Newspaper article, JL38

£80,000 flatlets block for elderly

(Photo). Mr. Ted Rowlands, parliamentary under secretary of state for Wales, opens, St Cadoc’s Court old people’s flatlets, Raglan, watched by Mr. A.Beer, architect and Councilllor, O. Williams, chairman of the Monmouth rural district council (right)

An £80,000 block of old people’s flatlets was opened at Raglan on Friday by Mr. Ted Rowlands, the under secretary of state for Wales.

The flats — known as St. Cadoc’s Court — will eventually form part of a development of almost 100 buildings.

The flats offered both independence and security and were of a kind that government encouraged local authorities to build, said Mr. Rowlands.

REPLIAS

“One in every four or five dwellings being built in Wales is designed for the elderly,” he added.

“But there is still a great deal to be done because one person in eight is of pensionable age. In twenty years time the number of people over 75 will have increased by a third.

“There should be replicas of this scheme everywhere. Government subsidies cover almost half the cost.”

KEY

Mr Rowlands was presented with an inscribed key by Mr Arthur Beer, the architect of the scheme.

Among the 100 guests at the ceremony was Councillor W.O. Williams, chairman of Raglan council. He welcomed Mr. Rowlands.

The building was blessed by the Rev. Alcwyn Jones, Raglan Baptist minister, and the Rev. A.V. Blake, vicar of Raglan

——

1970 - Programme for opening of St Cadoc's Court - JL39 / JL39A

Monmouth Rural District Council

Programme ————— Opening of St. Cadoc’s Court, Raglan - by The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Wales, Mr. Edward Rowlands, M.P., on Friday the 17th April, 1970, at 3. p.m.

Chairman to extend a welcome to Guests.

Architect to present an inscribed key to the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State who will then perform the official Opening.

Reply by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State

View the building by all present

4 p.m. approximately - presentation in the lounge of a painting on behalf of Messrs. Davies, Belfield & Everest, (Quantity Surveyors ) to The Warden (on behalf of the tenants).

The Buiding to be Blessed by the Reverent A.V. Blake and The Reverend A. Jones


BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ACCOMODATION The building is designed on the Old Auction Field at Raglan, as part of a housing development which will ultimately include another 70 dwellings. There are 23 flatlets and Wardens accommodation provided in the present scheme. Each flatlet has a small Hall, Toilet with wash-basin and w.c., Galley Kitchen and Living Space. In the two-person flats there are separate Living Rooms and Bedrooms but the ‘batchelor’ flats have combined Bedsitters. In addition, there are bathrooms and showers distributed through the building which can be used as most convenient to the occupants. There is also a Communal Lounge with an open fire and several Sitting / Reading areas together with a Communal Laundry Room.

The Architect is Arthur T. Beer, ow a Partner in the Owen Luder Partnership with offices in newport, London, harrogate, Newcastle and an associated office in Brussels. he has maintained a long low look to the building, incorporating a rambling pitched roof, which is deliberately intended not to obtrude into its rural location. External materials are natural slate coloured concrete tiles, facing bricks and timber boarding. These materials will be echoed in the surrounding houses as they are built.

The ‘L’-shaped plan of the building is orientated to trap the sun and a pleasant loggia and paving, grassing and planting are all designed to establish a restful garden.

The Advanced preparation Roadworks have already been carried out for the whole site and include a footway between two existing hedges leading towards the village shops. the value of the Flatlets contract alone is approximately £60,000. Quantity Surveying services have been provided by Mrssrs. Davis, Belfield & Everest of Newport, London, Oxford, Cambridge, Gateshead, Norwich and Leeds and the General Contractors are the Newport firm, David Atwell & Richardson

1990, 20th anniversary of St Cadoc's Court , JL40 Monmouthshire Beacon, Friday, April 27th, 1990

(image) Left to right: Miss Nora Grant, Mrs Sylvia Price, Mrs Ann Fowler, the Monmouth Borough Mayor and Mayoress (Coun. and Mrs Brian Cowles), Mrs Edith Langley and Mrs Bernice Holton

Birthdays are regular occasions for celebration among the elderly residents at St Cadoc’s Court, raglan but last Friday it was the twentieth anniversary of the ‘Court’ itself which brought together residents, staff and guests for a rather special celebratory party.

A beautifully iced cake made by Mrs Denise Millard of Monmouth, and a delicious birthday tea, set the scene for a happy afternoon.

Among the 17 residents present were three ladies who have been at St Cadoc’s since it opened - Mrs Edith Langley, Mrs Ann Fowler and Miss Nora Grant - as well as the Court’s oldest resident, Mrs. Sarah Moon, who is 94.

Guests included the Monmouth Borough mayor and Mayoress (Cllr and Mrs Brian Cowles), Cllr Dilwyn Watkins (Chairman of Raglan Community Council) and Mrs Watkins, the Vicar (Canon Peter Gower), Mrs Rosaline Jones (wife of the Minister, Raglan Baptist Church), Mr. J. Bevan (Environmental Health and HousingDepartment), Miss Heather Colls (Social Worker, Gwent County Council), Mrs. Janet Watts (Sheltered Housing Officer) and Mrs. Mary Morris (Warden, Prince Charles Close).

The party was organised by the Warden, Mrs Jean Langley, who has been at St Cadoc’s Court since it opened, as has one of her staff, Mrs Bernice Holton. Mrs Sylvia Price (Assistant Warden) has been with them for the past 16 years.

— fascinating collection of old photographs and taped memories of days gone by

Although situated on the outskirts of the village, St Cadoc’s enjoys a close link with the community receiving regular visits from the various village associations. Church services are held three times a month. Many residents are members of local groups such as the VPA and Companions Club, or enjoy an evening out at a whist drive. Those who have difficulty in getting out can take advantage of the frequent visits from hairdressing and library services.

‘We are one big happy family,’ said Mrs Langley whose husband Brian, a residential care officer at Nantyderry, devotes much of his spare time working for the Court where he is affectionately known as ‘Mr Fixit!’

A toast to St Cadoc’s Court was proposed by the Mayor, with Mrs Langley responding Mrs Lily Stephens (Chairman,) St Cadoc’s Court Social Club) said’ Thank you’ on behalf of the residents with Cllr Watkins expressing thanks on behalf of the guests.

The party on Friday was followed by an informal tea party with the Court’s friends and neighbours from Prince Charles Close, providing another happy occasion to add to so many other pleasant memories in the twenty year history of St Cadoc’s Court

1990, Retirement of Canon Peter Gower: Jean Langley (Warden) and Mrs Mary Morris (Warden), JL41 / JL41A

Forest of Dean gazette, Friday, Aug 24th, 1990

(image: Jean Langley, Canon peter Gower, Mrs Gower?, Mrs Sylvia Price)

Canon Peter Gower, who retires at the end of the month after 15 years as incumbent at St Cadoc’s Church, Raglan, was guest of honour at a special coffee morning held at St Cadoc’s Court, Raglan, last Wednesday. Believing he had simply been invited over to coffee, Canon Gower was surprised and delighted to find himself the recipient of two cheques Mrs Jean Langley (Warden) presented him with a cheque on behalf of staff and residents of St Cadoc’s Court and Mrs Mary Morris (Warden) made the presentation on behalf of the residents of Prince Charles Close. The two Wardens, together with Mrs Sylvia Price (assistant Warden) also presented Canon Gower with a house-warming gift of a bottle of brandy - purely for medicinal purposes!

During his 15 years as Vicar of raglan, Canon Gower has been a regular visitor to St Cadoc’s Court, conducting monthly Sunday services and Holy Communion, and supporting the many social activities held at the Court.

A special Evensong will be held at St Cadoc’s Church on Sunday to mark his retirement

undated, News clipping: Sing-a-long-a-Bryn. Bryn Yemm and wife Anne play for St Cadoc's residents, JL74 Sing-a-long-a-Bryn

It was a real star studded occasion for residents of St Cadoc’s Court, raglan, when Abergavenny recording artist Bryn Yemm and his wife Anne turned up to provide a little light entertainment.

The audience were soon joining in with old favourites and even a few of Bryn’s newer songs from his recent release ‘Like Strangers.’

Bryn and his wife have already raised £243 towards their target of £1000 which will go to a children’s home in Kent, and they hope to double this on March 16 when they will be staging a show for the Senior Citizens at Bailey’s Club, Caerleon

(http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/music/sites/beatles/pages/abergavenny_630622.shtml — video includes Bryn Yemm comments)

songs: http://musicax.net/album/id:426858621/tid:426858668/Abergavenny#play/tid/426858668

1990 - 20th Anniversary of St Cadoc's Court. April 1990. News articles: Charity Appeal, This week 25 years ago., JL63

It was party time at St Cadoc’s Court, Raglan, last Thursday when residents were joined by local councillors and representatives of local organisations to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the opening of the block of old people’s flatlets. A special anniversary cake, iced by Mrs Sylvia Bird, was cut by the Warden, Mrs Jean Langley, who is pictured with residents, Mrs Lily Stephens, Mr. Bert Bennett, Miss Nora Grant, who has been at St Cadoc’s since it opened, and assistant Mrs. Bernice Holton

1990 - Best ever a Raglan., JL63

Best ever at Raglan

The 21st Annual Coffee Morning and Sale of Work, held at St Cadoc’s Court, Raglan, on Saturday proved the best ever.

Always popular, this year’s event attracted a bumper crowd of residents and their families together with friends from the local community among them the Rural Dean (Rev. Roy Calt), and Councillor Mrs. Gwyneth Morgan.

With Christmas fast approaching many visitors were delighted to find just the gift they were looking for from a variety of well stocked stalls.

An eye-catching array of hand knitted items, made by residents, offered something for all the family, from socks, tea-cosies and covered coat hangers, to children’s gloves and knitted mice.

Another attraction was the craft stall with a super selection of soft toys, trays and other items made by Mr Brian Langley, whose wife, Jean is warden at St Cadoc’s Court. Cakes made by staff and friends were soon snapped up while the bric-a-brac stall proved a happy hunting ground for bargain hunters.

There was a prize draw with over 40 prizes (names of winners on display at the village Post Office). Mrs D Millard kindly made a rich fruit cake for the “Guess the weight of the cake’ competition which resulted in three correct guesses of four pounds and two ounces with Mrs. Alice Pitt winning the ensuing draw to choose the recipient.

Proceeds from the event will go to the St Cadoc’s Court Social Fund —— undated, Tug of War led to Marriage - news article and photo of Mr and Mrs William Jones (born at Wern-Y-Court, Bryngwyn) attended Raglan School until age 13, JL65

TUG-OF-WAR LED TO MARRIAGE

Married at Llantilio crossenny Church on October 26th, 1921, Mr. and Mrs. William Jones, of St. Cadoc’s Court, Raglan, celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on Tuesday of last week. A month later they went through a second wedding ceremony at Glen Trothy Roman Catholic Church, Llanvetherine, as the bride Violet Cathering Powell, born at the Bont House, grosmone was a Catholic.

The couple first met at the Peace Celebrations at Llangattock Lingoed in 1919. Violet Powell was taking part in a tug-of-war match between teams of married and single women, and as Mr. Jones smilingly added “I was the adjudicator.” Two years later they were married.

SERVICE

Born at Wern-Y-Court, Bryngwyn, Mr. Jones left Raglan School at the age of 13 and went to work on a farm. Later he worked in the Powell Duffryn engine sheds at Aberdare, and when Mr. and Mrs. Jones were married he worked as a coal miner at Tredegar. In the First World War he served with the 3rd Mons Regiment and later with the 19th Lancs as a sergeant. For seven months he was a prisoner of war in Germany. Mr. Jones has one regret — that he did not stay in the army. Instead he worked in the building trade which took him all over the country. Mr. and Mrs. Jones, who moved to Raglan early last year from Gwernesney, are very happy at St. Cadoc’s Court. Although Mr. Jones is 87 and partially lost his sight as the result of an accident, his mind is very active and he has a remarkable memory. Mrs. Jones who is 70 is very active.

With two sons, five daughters, 20 grandchildren and six great grandchildren, arrangements for a family party had to be postponed to the eek end to enable those from a distance to get to the village.

But the great day — Tuesday — did not go by without celebrations. There was a surprise party for the happy couple at St. Cadoc’s Court, organised by the warden (Mrs. Langley) with all the residents joining in. On display there were nearly 40 congratulatory cards and four telegrams.

Then on Saturday evening at the Jeffrey’s hall, there were nearly 60 present for the family gathering. Included were three sets of five generations, ranging from two five month old infants to the 94 year mother of Mrs Jones, and they came from as far away as Southend, Reigate and Beverley in Yorkshire.

Unfortunately Mr. Jones had not been too well recently, and had to leave early, but he had many visitors over the weekend


Images and articles about St Cadoc's Court (see the flickr Raglan_History )

1971 Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony - front page JL32 1971 Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony - front page JL32 1971 Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony - intro and front page JL32A 1971 Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony - front page: St Cadoc's Court photo and information JL32B 1971 Housing Medal Awards 1971. St Cadoc's Court award ceremony - front page: St Cadoc's Court photo and information JL32B01 1971 Housing Medal Awards 1971. Invitation for Jean Langley JL32B01 1972 Image of St Cadoc's Court. District Councils Review, Vol one, Sept 1972 JL33 1972 Article: St Cadoc's Court. District Councils Review, Vol one, Sept 1972 JL33A 1972 Article part 2: St Cadoc's Court. District Councils Review, Vol one, Sept 1972 JL33B 1971 News clippings re St Cadoc's Court. Good neighbour family, Tributes to Warden, Awards for Gwent housing, congratulations JL34 1971 Letter from Welsh Office regarding 1971 Houseing Medal Competition JL35 1970 Haven of rest in new Flatlets, Newspaper article JL36 1970 Minister opens St Cadoc's Court, Newspaper article. L-R: Mr. Ted Rowlands, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Wales, opens the St. Cadoc's Court old people's flatlets at Raglan, with the inscribed key presented by the architect, Mr Arthur Beer, and watched by the Chairman of Monouth R.D. C. (Councillor W.O. Williams) JL37 1971 Minister opens St Cadoc's Court, Newspaper article - part 2 JL37a 1970 £80,000 Flatlets block for elderly opened at Raglan. Newspaper article JL38 1970 Programme for opening of St Cadoc's Court - p1 JL39 1970 Programme for opening of St Cadoc's Court - p1 JL39a 1990 20th anniversary of St Cadoc's Court PT1 JL40 1990 20th anniversary of St Cadoc's Court PT 2 JL40A 1990 20th anniversary of St Cadoc's Court IMAGE. L-R. Miss Nora Grant, Mrs Sylvia Price, Mrs Ann Fowler, the Monmouth Borough Mayor and Mayoress (Coun. And Mrs Brian Cowles), Mrs Edith Langley, Ms Jean Langley and Mrs Bernice Holton JL40B 1990 Retirement of Canon Peter Gower: Jean Langley (Warden) and Mrs Mary Morris (Warden) JL41 1990 Retirement of Canon Gower - news article (Monmouthshire Beacon, Friday, Aug 24th 1990 JL41a

Vicar and Baptist Minister JL42

Sylvia Price and Jean Langley at St Cadoc's Court JL43

Sylvia Price dressed up with two cups of tea JL44

Glenys Jones (Home Help), Jean Langley and Sylvia Price JL45

Jean Langley, Sylvia Price, Bernice Holton (Wendy in PO's mam) JL46 1993 top (Glenys Jones (Home Help), Jean Langley and Sylvia Pric), Middle: 3 women at tea, Bottom: 1993 Harvest Festival JL47

1993 top: Sylvia and Jean, Harvest Festival, middle: 6 people on outing, bottom: Jean eating ice cream (Bristol Zoo?) JL48

1994 Top: Jean and 4 ladies in lounge, middle: Jean and 4 ladies, bottom: stuffed animals JL49

1977 7 June, 1977: Queen's Silver Jubilee celebration at St Cadoc's Court. Top: visitors and residents - incl. Dr Johnson, wife and child.; bottomJean, ?, and Sylvia wearing badges, JL50

1977 7 June, 1977: Queen's Silver Jubilee celebration at St Cadoc's Court. Top: 4 men eating meal. Bottom: one man and three women wearing hats at tea JL51

1980 5 residents who were at St Cadoc's Court from its opening. Celebrating 10 years. L-R: Jean Langley (Warden), Nurse Grant, Mrs Startup, Mrs Langley, Mrs Fowler, Miss Gibbon JL52

Jean Langley & 4 others cutting cake JL53

Jean Langley e JL5301

Harvest: -----------, Mrs Jones of The Dell sitting on deck chair (she was active at Chapel) JL54


JL55

Mr/Mrs Jones Golden Wedding x 2, Llangorse Lake outing: 3 women l-r: Maggie Pritvchard, Jenny Jones (living in small cottage on Chepstow Rd near cattery), Jessie Rogers, also Joan Langley organising the food and bus JL56

Summer: top:?, middle: Nant y dwi tea: l-r: Corona, 'cona' Williams, Mrs Wheeler (ladies maid to Pryce Jenkins family at Willbsbrook house), Mrs 'Clares" Gould (bungalow). Bottom: Strawberry tea - Gran Langley and Mrs Cowles JL57

Nant y deri Strawberry Tea held at residental home nr. Goitre: upper, L-r: Nora Grant, Amy Powell & Mrs Lucas. Middle: Jean Langley and Bernice Holton, bottom: Ivan Jones (on left, Mr and Mrs Hanner (on back) and Gwynfa Miles (on right) JL58

Fancy hats: top: Mr Harry Powell and wife Marge: middle:Colna and two 'miss Smiths' Fanny and Nellie Smith (they did wonderful handicraft needle work and cushions etc. Bottom: Mrs Morgan ("Big"), lived at Sunny Vale (her daughter still lives there((, Mrs Mary Lewis, Mrs Doris Ellzway and Colna JL59

Fancy Hats: Top: Mrs Fowler, Frank Pitt (was Cavalry officer in WWI and worked in electical company in Cornwall. He also served in WWII. He had lived in Abergaenny, Mrs Moffat: 2nd: Mrs Lucas, Mrs Cook, Gran langley, Colna Williams, Mrs Fowler. 3rd: Mr Vedmore, Mrs Moffitt (Sarah), Mrs Startup, Olwyn Morris. 4th: Gran Langley JL60

Roger Hancock+ mor. Toasting. Nora Grant on right side.middle: Fancy hats Syllvia Price, Amy Powell, Bernice Holton, Jean Langley. Bottom: Fancy hats: JL61

1990 Easter Bonnets: JL62

1990 20th Anniversary of St Cadoc's Court. April 1990. News articles: Charity Appeal, This week 25 years ago. Best ever a Raglan. JL63

1990 20th Anniversary St Cadoc's party photo's JL64

Tug of War led to Marriage - news article and photo of Mr and Mrs William Jones (born at Wern-Y-Court, Bryngwyn) attended Raglan School until age 13 JL65

Photo's of residents JL66

Birthdays: top: Mrs Ollie (Olwyn) Morris. middle: Mrs Ollie Morris, 80th bday, bottom: Mrs Florrie Higgenson, 90th bday. JL67 1980's Celebrations: top left: Mrs Moffatt, 90th bday. Top right: ? Greetings, 23 April 1984. group: Lower left: Mrs Hornby 90th bday (Jean Howes mam). Lower right: Robert Hancock's Dad's 90th bday (retired Bank manager) JL68


Christmas: JL70

Christmas: JL71

Christmas: JL73

News clipping: Sing-a-long-a-Bryn. Bryn Yemm and wife Anne play for St Cadoc's residents JL74

Bryn Yemm and St Cadoc's Court (2 photo's) (2012)

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