St Cadoc's Church

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NOTE: the links aren't working correctly and some of these doc's is probably used doubly -- need to confirm. aud 2017, CLM)

PART 1: St Cadoc's Church part 1 [[1]]

PART 2: St Cadoc's Church to St Cadoc;s Churchyard trail -

Contents

The first Church building in Raglan was erected in the 6th century. Known as "The Age of the Saints" it would have been a log hut with a thatched roof, or made of sods and wattle and mud. The spot as an ideal “church point” with a “church village” close by (suggests Professor E.G. Bowen)

Restoration of Raglan Church, 1867-1868 yr


1953. A Momentous year for St. Cadoc’s Church

Just in time to ring for the Coronation, Mrs. Daniel Thomas presented a peal of electronic bells. This invention was perfected during the war by a Frenchman, Constant Martin, while he was a prisoner in a slave labour camp. The Miller Organ Company of Norwich manufacture these bells and those at Raglan are stated to be the first installed in any English or Welsh church.

The Silverthorne family gave a fine Processional Cross and Mrs. Hamer Lewis a new Altar, panelling, curtains and chancel furniture, replacing priests’ stalls which greatly dwarfed the appearance of the chancel. Also in 1953 came a significant return to the past. The parish of Llandenny, after a separation of sixty years, was reunited to Raglan under the charge of one Vicar, the Rev. W.J. Price.

During recent years it has been found impossible to provide incumbents for all country parishes and grouping of parishes has increased accordingly. In December, 1972, the Parish of Llansoy, in the rural deanery of Usk was added to the existing group of Raglan and Llandenny. It has now been attached elsewhere and Bryngwyn is now attached to Raglan and Llandenny.

Also in December of that year the Vicar of Raglan was made a Canon of the diocese of Monmouth and was installed to his seat in St. Woolos Cathedral in January 1973. Canon A.V. Blake was the first Vicar of Raglan to be made a Canon whilst Vicar of the Parish.

2000 - Millennium at St Cadoc To celebrate the Millennium, the west door was reopened and the Tower Screen was installed. In 2010, the Pews in the Lady and Beaufort Chapels were replaced with chairs generously donated by parishioners and friends. The floor in the Beaufort Chapel was lowered and carpeted and a new Alter Table carved by a local artist was installed in this chapel.

More History....

  St Cadoc's Church Tour, 2017
  St Cadoc's Church, as viewed by Fred Hando,1964
   [http://www.raglan-parishes.org.uk/Raglan_Parishes/St_Cadocs_Gravestones/St_Cadocs_Gravestones.html St Cadoc's
   St Cadoc's[Gravestones]
   Raglan Under Siege 1646
   Rev William Powell
   Rev Wyatt 



Four ancient tracks would have met at Raglan just as four roads meet outside the churchyard wall today. The brook would have been useful for baptisms and there was possibly a hermit’s cell beside it. The foundation in Raglan St. Cadoc the Patron Saint of Monmouthshire, includes Raglan in a list of nine churches dedicated to him, while stressing that he might only have had a fleeting connection with the site. In 1236 the church at Raglan paid tithes to Usk Priory.

The present Church was probably built by the Clares, the early lords of this District and completed by the Bluets in the fourteenth century. The oldest parts of the Church today are the barrel roof and the door which once led to the rood-loft remains as an entrance to the pulpit.

In 1354 the town consisted of "the market cross, the focal point of the community, located in Beaufort Square opposite the church, and it is likely that the 68 burgages (or buildings) lined the two highways, the High Street and Castle Street, leading from it." (source: Ian Soulsby's 1983 book, The Towns of Medieval Wales)

Most of the Church we see today was built by William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke and his son, another William. Herbert inherited Raglan Castle from his father, Sir William ap Thomas, and on July 16th, 1469 he made a will just before he was taken prisoner at the battle of Edgecote and beheaded. “I bequeath” says the will “all the Salt that I have outsept as much as will make the Body and Iles of the Church at Raglan as it (is) purposed now by me. The Chauncell to be at the pleasure of God.” His son, the 1st Earl of Huntingdon, made a further bequest for the building in his will dated 1483, and he lived until 1491.

The vault contains the following monuments of the Somerset family—William, third Earl of Worcester, K.G. who died 1588; his son Edward, fourth Earl, K.G., obit 1628 and Edward, sixth Earl, and second Marquis of Worcester, obit 1667. The last had been created, during the lifetime of his father, Earl of Glamorgan.(06/02/1858)

In 1646 - (At the time of the siege of Raglan), the church was held by the Roman Catholic's, and from documents obtained from Lord Raglan and other persons, he had found that the church was then in perfect repair; the windows being formed of stained glass, the monuments, which were exquisite, were quite perfect, the floor paved with encaustic tiles ([2]) ,and the tower being garnished with a pinnacle on each corner, while the preacher's cross was in a state equal to when it was turned out of the hands of the sculptor, but all these things were mutilated during the great rebellion, by the army under Fairfax, and even now there was a perforation in the tower, which they had made to overlook what was going on in the castle (Source: Rev Wyatt, 1867, Restoration of Raglan Church)

A stone plaque on the north wall says, “God ye church will mend” and the date 1698, with initials of the possible churchwardens. It must be remembered that this was the year in which the Duke of Beaufort’s heir the Marquess of Worcester, was fatally injured in a coach accident between Monmouth and Raglan. He was the fourth of the Beaufort’s children to be buried in the vault so that the Duke would readily have done his part in God’s “mending of the church.”

In the 1860's, the 8th Duke of Beaufort, the then owner of the castle and much land and property in and around Raglan, had the north aisle (now the Lady Chapel) built, reflecting an increase in the population of the village. The chancel was also restored at this time by T.H. Wyatt, and many windows were repaired. Much of the stained and coloured glass dates from this period, as do most of the interior wooden screens and fittings.

A plaque in the Church tower reads: To the Glory of God and in loving remembrance of Arthur Montague Wyatt, Vicar of this Parish from 1864 to 1874. The western Window of this Church is dedicated. During his incumbency and mainly by his exertions this Church was restored, enlarged and embellished. It was re-opened the 27th of August 1868

Restoration of Raglan Church, 1867-1868 May 31, 1867 At the time of the siege of Raglan, the church was held by a Roman Catholic, and from documents obtained from Lord Raglan and other persons, he had found that the church was then in perfect repair; the windows being formed of stained glass, the monuments, which were exquisite, were quite perfect, the floor paved with encaustic tiles, and the tower being garnished with a pinnacle on each corner, while the preacher's cross was in a state equal to when it was turned out of the hands of the sculptor, but all these things were mutilated during the great rebellion, by the army under Fairfax, and even now there was a perforation in the tower, which they had made to overlook what was going on in the castle.

He produced the plans, which showed that a thorough restoration was contemplated, and that it was to be enlarged on the north side. Some graves would have been disturbed by this, and he had obtained a faculty, which cost £20, for removing the bodies. There were several other things to be done heating, paving, seating, fencing the churchyard, &c., and there was a deficiency of some £ 700. It was to ask their aid that this meeting had been called. He did not wish them to give him a penny towards beautifying his church, no not even to purchase a hassock. What he wished them to do was for their own convenience; for their own necessity; for the good of dissenters as well as churchmen. The clock tower was in a state of decay, and as Miss Bosanquet had promised one or two new faces to it, he thought it should be repaired. Every one knew that it was painful to bury, as a grave could not be dug without turning up quantities of bones, and, therefore, it had been found, necessary to enlarge the church-yard. It was for these purposes that he asked their aid, and when they came to consider what had been done by others, they could scarcely fail to see it was their duty to assist. ---

August 1868 RE-OPENING OF RAGLAN CHURCH. The church of St. Cadocas, Raglan, which for upwards of twelve months has been closed for the purpose of a thorough restoration, was on Thursday last re-opened. The present Vicar, the Rev. A. M. Wyatt, has only held the living between three and four years, but during that time has been indefatigable in raising subscriptions for the good work which is now happily brought to a close. Some fifteen months ago the church was in a most wretched state, and had more the appearance of a barn than of a church, and it was estimated that some £ 2,000 were required for restoring it. Tenders for the work were solicited, and that of Mr. J. Hoskins, of Abergavenny, was accepted.

The tower, which at some time had been garnished with pinnacles, but which in 1867 was minus these ornaments, has had four more beautiful foliated ones added to the corners. The body of the tower and the church has been cleaned and pointed.

Inside the building the walls have had the plaster cleared away, and are now pointed with mortar of a stone colour, being enlivened by the sides of the windows being pointed with red. A new north aisle, capable of holding- some 80 persons, has been added, and is handsomely ornamented by two beautiful freestone arches and pillars, and by a stained open wood work ceiling.

The Beaufort chapel and chancel have been restored at the expense of the Duke of Beaufort, and it is here where the principal part of the decorations have been added. The ceilings of both are circular, and are pannelled with stained boards, and that of the chancel is beautifully decorated and enlivened by embossed gilt carvings, in which the monograms IHS and AO figure largely.

A.D. 1868- In the Beaufort chapel over the mutilated figures of two personages, a male and female, supposed to be representations of Edward, 4th Earl of Worcester, and his wife, His Grace the Duke of Beaufort has had a brass plate mounted on black marble fixed in the wall. The monument is surmounted with the arms of the Somersets, and underneath is the following inscription "This and other elaborate monuments to the memory of the Somerset family, who are interred in this chapel, were ruthlessly destroyed by the Parliamentary soldiers after the siege of Raglan Castle, in 1640. To repair as far as possible the loss of such records this tablet has been placed here by Henry, 8th Duke of Beaufort, who at the same time, restored this chancel, and the adjoining chancel, A.D. 1868.

On the Western side of this monument is a painted window of four divisions, which was placed in the church in the year 1860, in commemoration of the late Lord Raglan, and describes the engagements in which he took part. This window has been removed from the east end to this place, and a large plain white glass window, the only plain one in the church, now occupies its place. (note: This window, located behind the organ, now commemorates a Beaufort Marriage)

In the east end of the chancel a beautiful stained glass memorial window has been placed by Mrs. Morgan, Blue Broom, to the memory of her husband. The subjects in the window being the Birth, the Crucifixion, the Resurrection," and the Ascension of our Lord. The sacrarium and the chancel together, with the Beaufort chapel, are beautifully paved with Broseley tiles.

All the other windows are of opaque white and buff tinted glass, with several circular pieces down the centre of each compartment bearing alternatively the letters I.H.S., and the Alpha and Omega of the Greek alphabet, these circles as well as the compartments have all narrow borders of crimson glass.

The window behind the pulpit is formed of small diamond squares on each of which the Alpha and Omega are inscribed.

The communion table is constructed of old oaken panels, which have been polished and beautifully decorated with monograms,-a cross and crown in gilt, and with the text, "A Contrite Heart," "0 God thou wilt not despise," carved in the wood, and pricked out in white.

Right and left of the table the walls are panelled with polished oak boards, which are also beautifully enlivened by gilt carved monograms and designs. On the top of the table is placed a handsome crimson altar cloth, with crimson and gold fringes, the gift of Mrs. A. M. Wyatt.

On the pillars which form the gateway into the sacrarium are fixed two large and handsome candlesticks. Below the rails are placed the choir seats and the harmonium, and immediately below these are the reading stalls, one on either side, and each of them made to seat two clergymen. In the middle of the aisle is a beautiful lectern.

The pulpit is placed in the south eastern corner of the nave. It is of carved oak, on a stone basis, and is the design of the Rev. A. M. Wyatt. The middle panel is an oval design, having for its centre a gilt key, with the text, He that hath the key of David," carved round it, and pricked in white. Round the top of the pulpit the text." Blessed are they that hear the Word of God and keep it," is also carved and pricked out in white. The pulpit is entered by means of an old stone staircase, which was discovered after the work of restoration commenced, and which in Roman Catholic days led to the rood loft.

In the reading stalls, commencing on the left, and ending on the right, is carved-" 0 come let us worship and fall down, and kneel before, the Lord our Maker."

In the nave the ceiling is of plaster-cream colored -of a circular formation, and relieved by stained and polished ribs.

The old and ugly gallery has been removed from the church, and the entrance, which in 1867 was under the tower at the west end, has been once more removed to its original position on the south side of the church, and what till lately formed the vestry, is now again used as the porch, while a small vestry has been built on to the south side of the chancel.

The two entrances into the churchyard have been stopped, and now there is one handsome lich gate as an entrance facing the porch. A new piece has been added to the east end of the churchyard, and is nicely bordered by shrubs.

Prior to the restoration, the church was filled with unsightly and uneasy box pews, but now there is accommodation for some 350 people, and every seat is free, and more than that, very comfortable. The building is lighted by six handsome chandeliers.


1953. A Momentous year for St. Cadoc’s Church. Just in time to ring for the Coronation, Mrs. Daniel Thomas presented a peal of electronic bells. This invention was perfected during the war by a Frenchman, Constant Martin, while he was a prisoner in a slave labour camp. The Miller Organ Company of Norwich manufacture these bells and those at Raglan are stated to be the first installed in any English or Welsh church.

The Silverthorne family gave a fine Processional Cross and Mrs. Hamer Lewis a new Altar, panelling, curtains and chancel furniture, replacing priests’ stalls which greatly dwarfed the appearance of the chancel. Also in 1953 came a significant return to the past. The parish of Llandenny, after a separation of sixty years, was reunited to Raglan under the charge of one Vicar, the Rev. W.J. Price.

During recent years it has been found impossible to provide incumbents for all country parishes and grouping of parishes has increased accordingly. In December, 1972, the Parish of Llansoy, in the rural deanery of Usk was added to the existing group of Raglan and Llandenny. It has now been attached elsewhere and Bryngwyn is now attached to Raglan and Llandenny.

Also in December of that year the Vicar of Raglan was made a Canon of the diocese of Monmouth and was installed to his seat in St. Woolos Cathedral in January 1973. Canon A.V. Blake was the first Vicar of Raglan to be made a Canon whilst Vicar of the Parish.

Millennium and beyond To celebrate the Millennium, the west door was reopened and the Tower Screen was installed. In 2010, the Pews in the Lady and Beaufort Chapels were replaced with chairs generously donated by parishioners and friends. The floor in the Beaufort Chapel was lowered and carpeted and a new Alter Table carved by a local artist was installed in this chapel.

St Cadoc's Church, as viewed by Fred Hando, 1964

St Cadoc's Church (minus Yew tree!)

Maybe one in a thousand of the invaders who crowd on Raglan castle spares a few minutes to see the church. That one is enriched by the anti-climax, for there is much in st. Cadoc's -- so lovingly tended by its parishioners -- to fill in details of the story of Raglan.

My old six-inch map shows the church and vicarage at crossroads in a hamlet which comprised two smithies, a school (boys and girls), a big orchard, a pound, a post office, several inns, a Baptist and an independent chapel, a police station, Caestorie Cottage, Willsbrook (probably from "Nant Wilcae") and Hill Cottage. On the map, comically, Raglan seems like an insect, its body the High street swelling into Beaufort Square, its five legs the roads leading into and out of the village.

Obtaining from my friend, the happy vicar of raglan, permission to remove a huge yew which obstructed my view of the church-- "Certainly. Cut it down. take it home with you" -- I settled to my pleasant task of recording the church in line.

base and steps of churchyard cross

In the centre foreground arose the four steps and the interesting based of the churchyard cross. Broached, and decorated with quatrefoils, one of which has been recessed by a inch used perhaps for relics, perhaps for gifts, it is a fine medieval survival.

I found the tower engrossing. Aspiring over the battlements, the pinnacles are not merely crocheted, but recessed and these recesses are thrice repeated on each of the buttresses and trefoiled. Five slits light the stairs.

The clock, made by Henry Caerleon, was presented by Miss Maria Bosanquet in 1863. Horatia Durant's guide to the church we read that the railway, opened in 1860, had incurred Miss Bosanquet's displeasure, so she decreed that no clock face should be installed on the side of the tower facing the station. Nigh on a century ago!

The same benefactress gave six bells to St. Cadoc's, but misliking their sound, transferred them to Llandenny. two bells, one by Rudhall, dated 1785, and the other, of 44 in. diameter, dated 1805, occupy the tower, and the clock strikes on the larger bell.

There was, until recently, a doubt about the dedication of Raglan Church. The vicar has now in his possession the will, in Latin, of William Harding, of Raglan, in which a reference is made to "Sancta Cadoci villa de Raglan." That will was made in 1494.

Other treasures which I saw included the chalice of 1576, inscribed "Ragland," a chest of 1677 ("W.G.L., R.P."), another of 1755 (C.W., W.W., D.I."), a Welsh bible, registers from 1711, and the minute book of parish meetings from 1802.

Passing through the porch, with its remains of a stoup, we turned to examine an interesting relic behind the font. Semi-octagonal in shape, and beautifully decorated with angels and shields, it was discovered in the vicarage garden in 1928, and on the assumption that it was a font, or half a font, placed in the church. I favour the theory that it was fragment of a turret from the castle.

The barrel-roof is well preserved. Steps which once led to the rood-loft now serve the pulpit. Around the nave we noted the perpendicular arch to the tower, a three-light window in the north wall, two three-light windows, cinquefoiled, in the south wall, and two arches to the north aisle, added a century ago.

In the chancel the ancient piscina survives, and in the same wall are a couple of two-light windows. The window in the east wall portrays the nativity, the crucifixion and the resurrection scene, and below the Agnus Dei between lilies.

Two arches lead to the Beaufort Chapel. Over the mutilated monuments of the third and fourth Earls of Worcester and the wife of the latter is a brass tablet which announces, "This and other elaborate monuments to the memory of the Somerset family were ruthlessly destroyed by the Parliamentary soldiers after the siege of Raglan Castle in 1646." Mrs. Durant's guide is most helpful, especially in this corner.

In the north wall of the chapel is the window placed by "Five and forty Sergeants promoted in L.T. Corps for distinguished conduct under F.M. the Lord raglan." Aided by their brother officers they took this splendid way of commemorating "his memory, out of Gratitude and Love." The field-marshal died in 1855.

A framed notice records the visit in 1946 of the South Wales branch of the Institute of Civil Engineers to Raglan, "the scene of the labours and the last resting place of Edward Somerset, second Marquis of Worcester, who gave to the world the first practical Steam Engine, in 1663."

It was in that year that the marquis recorded the results of his experiments in "A Century of the Names and Scantlings of such Inventions as at present I can call to mind to have tried and perfected." I like to imagine his "fountain stream forty foot high" operating in the Fountain Court of the castle.

It is a far cry from Cadoc to the steam engine, and, later the "electronic bells." This village church enshrines saints, soldiers, inventors, peers and peasants.

Source: Raglan -- St. Cadoc's Church (Here and There in Monmouthshire, Fred Hando,1964, R.H. Johns Ltd., Newport, Mon)

====================

St Cadoc's Church Tour

The Chancel

[Scenes from the life of Christ], 1868 In 1868, Mary Morgan, of The Broom, dedicated the window behind the Alter in memory of her late husband, Philip Morgan. The stained glass window is: Scenes from the life of Christ Scenes from the Life of Christ http://stainedglass.llgc.org.uk/image/7622#largeimageThe window shows scenes from the Life of Jesus was made by Lavers, Barraud & Westlake (Plaque to the right of the Alter: "This window was given by Mary Morgan of the Broom in this parish in memory of her husband Philip Morgan and other relations. Aug 27, 1868" (Plaque to right of Alter) "In affectionate remembrance of Mary, widow of Philip Morgan of the Broom in this Parish who died 16 August 1877 aged 79 years". (Raglan burials, No. 127. d. 23 Aug 1877, 79 yr. H.P.

[St John the Baptist] with St Peter and St Paul, 1875 This window was dedicated by Raglan Village in honor of Rev Arthur Montague Wyatt (1810 - 74) who literally gave his life to the restoration of St Cadoc's Church in Victorian times. The angels hold the texts: 'We preach Christ crucified' (1 Corinthians 1:23). The scenes include John the Baptist with St Peter and St Paul Rev Wyatt, vicar of St Cadoc's in Raglan 1864-1874 is buried in our churchyard. In the Millennium, a clear glass was installed above the western entrance to the Church - from this location you can see this stain glass window reflected above the scene of the scenes from the life of Christ - a fitting tribute to Rev Wyatt.

Heraldry of the Beaufort Family The window was commissioned to commemorate the marriage of Lord Henry Somerset (1849–1932, second son of Henry Somerset, the 8th Duke of Beaufort) to Lady Isabel Somers-Cocks (1851–1921) in 1872.

Somerset, Vicar (images: P1040140, P1040141, P1040142,P1040143,P1040142: ) 
 The Lych Gate This is a l9th C reconstruction. The word lich means a body, and the roofed gateway was used to rest the corpse before burial.

The Preaching Cross : The preaching cross on the south side of the nave has been dated to the early 15th C, and a small niche can be seen which was probably designed to hold relics. The structure was damaged in the civil war and a modern shaft and cross installed, which has also been broken. The engravings on the base of the cross have long been indecipherable. On the left of the path to the church there is a little tombstone of considerable interest. Eighteen inches high and eighteen wide, it has small floral decorations in surprisingly good condition. The dedication is “In memory of Harriet May who died February 6th, 1856 at 35 and George May of Raglan Castle who died June 3rd 1857 at 48 years.” Here is direct proof that the Castle was inhabited at that date.

Entrance: A battered Holy Water Stoup is in its correct place on the right of the original stone doorway.

The South Porch and Doorway: The south porch is much as it was built in the 14th century, and retains its quaint little ogee windows, the one on the east side being original whilst the west one has been restored. The main doorway has a distinctive 15th C flattened arch. The door itself is l9th C. The porch was shown as a vestry in the 1860 plans, although this was not its original purpose, and it was restored to a doorway after the building of the vestry adjoining the chancel on the south side.

The Tower: Behind the font in the corner is the small door leading to the upper storeys of the tower (not open to the public). The base of the tower is used as a robing vestry for the choir.

Nave: The nave has a fine barrel roof typical of the area. The floor is lower than the chancel, and it is thought to have been lowered at some stage. The pews are of pine in a simple country style. At the south east corner stands the pulpit; it is approached from the nave by a stone stair which is all that remains of the access to the rood loft over the screen that would have stood at the chancel entrance in mediaeval times. The pulpit itself is Victorian, but look for some ancient carved panels on the front of the pulpit which may have been part of the medieval rood screen. The long nave and barrel roof are typical of the period. It will be noticed that the chancel is not in line with the nave but leans towards the south, a fact seen with startling clearness from a window in the tower. This is supposed to remind us of the drooping head of Christ on the Cross, the nave representing the Body, the transepts the Arms and the chancel the Head of Christ. Along the north wall is a leaning ledge on which the poor and infirm could sit in the days when there were no pews and richer people brought their stools. The lowering of the floor of the nave now makes it difficult to picture the ledge’s original purpose. By 1861 the population of Raglan parish had increased to nine hundred, and this must have prompted the 8th Duke of Beaufort to build the North aisle. He also restored the chancel, the east window being dated 1868. The old piscine is behind the credence table.

The Pulpit: The pulpit is of Victorian construction but incorporated are four carved panels of a much earlier date, probably 15th century. The entry is through an archway and the staircase once led to the rood-loft.

The Chancel: The chancel also has a barrel roof, only here it is stained dark and decorated with gilded bosses. The east window dates from the 1868 restoration, and contains scenes from the life of Jesus; it was given by Mary Morgan in memory of her husband and other members of their family. It was the work of Lavers, Barraud and Westlake of London, a well known maker, whose work can be seen in churches in Gloucestershire, and elsewhere in England. The choir stalls, priest's and reader's stalls and altar, with screen supports, rails and screens all in light oak were donated by Mrs Hamer-Lewis in 1953 in memory of members of her family. One of the 'Bishop's chairs' was given in memory of Roy Silverthorne, Organist and Choirmaster for 48 years.

The Beaufort Chapel: The Beaufort Chapel is situated on the north of the chancel, and was largely restored by the 8th Duke of Beaufort about 1868. Of the two windows one is a memorial of the 1st Lord Raglan who died in the Crimea in 1855, and the other commemorates the marriage of Lord Henry Somerset, the Duke’s son, and Lady Isabel Somers-Cocks in 1872.

The north window was prepared by Messrs. Bowden, of Bristol in memory of the first Lord Raglan, youngest son of Henry, fifth Duke of Beaufort. He was a military hero of many campaigns, commemorated in the window that names many of the great battles of his career. The inscription on the Raglan window reads:

In memoriam - Somerset, Raglan, Born 1788, Died 1855 Served in Denmark, 1807, Peninsula, Fuentes Don of Badajoz, Vittoria, Nenevelles Orthes Toulouse, Quatee Bras, Waterloo, Alma, Balaklava, Inkerman, Sebestopal

Court of Arms, Mutare vel timere sperno In memoriam Five and forty Sergeants promoted, in 1st Corps from all branches of the service for distinguished conduct under Field-Marshall Lord Raglan have, aided, by their Brother Officers placed this window to his memory of gratitude and love

The chapel also contains the remnants of several tombs of the Somerset family, including that of William, third earl of Worcester, who died in 1589; he was, as far as we know, the first to be buried there. Many of the family from then until 1704 are interred in the vault below the chapel. 
 On the north wall there are the remains of an alabaster canopied tomb, and below three battered effigies, two of which were supposed by Sir Joseph Bradney (in his History of Monmouthshire) to be those of the fourth Earl of Worcester and his wife. It is believed that the effigies were outside for many years after their destruction by the Parliamentarians, since they show signs of much weathering.In April, 1667, a funeral procession made its way from London, bringing the body of the 2nd Marquess of Worcester to be laid beside that of his first wife who had been dead for thirty years.

A tribute to this unfortunate but remarkable nobleman was paid by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers in 1946. “He gave to the world the first practical steam engine to be used in the service of man.” The Marquess had fondly hoped that a model of it would be buried with him. But sad to say it was evidently left behind in London. (see “the raid on raglan church)

In June, 1795, the Monmouthshire historian, Charles Heath, visited Raglan church. The pavement of the Beaufort Chapel had fallen in and by the light of a candle he descended six feet to a vault four yards square, with a further recess containing two figures enclosed in lead. The wood had mouldered away from seven coffins and the plates were lying on the floor in confusion. The names of those buried in the vault are recorded on a brass plate.

The Beaufort Chapel was re-furbished in 2009 when the floor was renewed, lowered and carpeted and the pews were replaced by chairs to allow for more comfort and greater flexibility in worship. The lighting in both chapels and the Chancel was improved at the same time.

Notice the two old parish chests on the floor against the west wall, inscribed with the initials of the churchwardens of the time and the year, 1677 and 1735 respectively. (note, theseparish chests have been moved to the entry of the church, (Aug, 2017)

The Organ: The present organ was built in 1908 by Sweetland of Bristol in the same place as the previous one and some of the same pipes were used. The vault was then opened and Mr Herbert Morris saw lead coffins in niches in the walls. The organ is located in front of the east window, somewhat obscuring the visitor's view of it. In 1962 the organ was completely restored and improved. In 1992, the organ was once again restored at a cost of nearly £12,000; the old pneumatic action was replaced by modern electric actuation. There is an old harmonium available as a standby in the event of power failures, etc.

The Tower: The tower is battlemented, and topped by crocketed turrets, installed in the 1860's restoration, when the top storey was rebuilt. It has a spiral staircase in the south-east corner giving access to each storey and eventually to the roof via a trapdoor. It originally had a ring of six bells, which were moved to the adjacent parish of Llandenny in the last century, supposedly on the whim of local gentlewoman Anna Maria Bosanquet, who considered them too noisy! She was however the benefactor who gave the tower clock, as recorded by a plaque on the west outside face of the tower, it is now powered electrically. Two 18th C bells remain, one of which is used as a tolling bell for services. She also presented a church clock in 1863 but the railway, opened three years earlier, had incurred her displeasure so she decreed the station should be punished by having no clock face in that direction. In 1963 the church clock, which had been giving trouble for some years, was changed to an electrical mechanism. This coincided with its centenary and certainly spared the clock winder from climbing the tower whenever it needed winding or attention, though power cuts are still rather a nuisance. In 1968 major work of restoration and pointing was carried out on the church tower.

Monuments inside the Church: There is an amusing epitaph on a memorial stone to the north of the chancel step, partly covered by the carpet, inscribed Here under lieth the body of Herbert Poskins Gent. who departed this life the 15th day of April Ano D’ni 1682 In love - I liv'd in faith I dy'd - My life I crav'd - God it deni'd.

There are many monuments of varying types and interest, too many to catalogue in this short guide. One of the finest is perhaps the 18th C classical stone tablet on the south wall of the sanctuary to Gulielmi (William) Pytt who died in 1779 aged 22.

A sad event still remembered keenly by friends and families was the tragic death in 1965 of four young friends in a car accident, three of them being Scouts of the 1st Raglan Troop - see the brass plaque on the east face of the projection from the south wall of the nave between the two large windows (under the Scout banner). • Image039: In ever loving memory of 2nd Lieut. Richard Douglas Pryce-Jenkin, ? South Wales Borderers, Born July 29th 1894, Killed in action at Festubert France, Dec 31st 1914 • Image040: In memory of Private JEREMIAH JENKINS, MGC and Gunner WILLIAM WILLIAMS REA, who gave their lives for their country in the Great War, 1914 - 1919 • Image041: In loving memory of ALEXANDER GRAHAM SPIERS LOGIE, M.B., M.S. who was 27 years Physician and Surgeon in this parish. he served as Captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the Great War. Born 12th March 1865, Died 1st Feb 1919 • image042: In the glory of GOD and in ever loving memory of ERIC STANLEY SAUNDERS who served this Church …..as organist … many years born 1 June 1885 and gave his life for his country June 19th 1917. Interred at Poperingle Flanders, …..


The CHURCHYARD:

St Cadoc's Church is surrounded by it's Church yard. The earliest known grave is that of Thomas WILLIAM who died in 1708. A survey of the graves in the Churchyard was completed in August, 1993 by J.H. Common and Vernon Davies. The survey was updated in 2011 and graveyard trails and a new map has been developed and a copy of the graveyard map along with a database of burials is available at St Cadoc's Church. Digital images of the known graves are available at the Raglan Parish website. At least 6 Vicars are buried in the Churchyard including: Rev. Charles Evans (Vicar of Dingestow), died, 1768; Rev. Arthur Montague Wyatt, died, 1874; Rev. Robert Shelley, d. 1943, Rev, Charles Duck, d. 1952; Canon Arthur Blake, d. 1982, and, Rev. Dilwyn Pugh, d. 1992. The most common names in the Churchyard are: Jones (38), Morgan (31), Powell (27), Williams (25), Davies (22), Evans (19), Price (15), Edwards (13). Three centenarians are buried in the Graveyard: Alice SUTTON, 1902 - 2007 (age 104), Ellen JENKINS, 1904 - 2002 (age 102) and Annie HARRIS, 1878 - 1978 (age 100)

St Cadoc's Churchyard tour: https://www.flickr.com/photos/raglan_history/albums/72157647037269257


The Vicars of Raglan 1500, Howell ap David ap Evan ap Rhys

1535, Walter David

1560, John Gallin (Gwillim)

1635, William Rogers

1640, William Davies 1661, John Davies

1678, Rice Morris

1682, William Hopkins

1709, Richard Tyler, B.A.

1715, David Price

1763, John Leach. B.A. 1781, Thomas Leach. (died 1796 at Blakeney, Glos)

1796, Charles Phillips, B.A.

1818, William Powell, M.A.

1866, Arthur Montague Wyatt. M.A.

(NOTE: Rev. Wyatt & Rev. Powell served together between 1864-1866)

1874, Henry Plantagenet Somerset, M.A.

1893, Charles Mathew Perkins, M.A. 1903, Robert Shelley Plant

1924, David James Sproule, B.A.

1928, Thomas Wright, B.A.

1939, Charles Duck, L. Div

1952, William Joseph Price

1958, Arthur Vernon Blake, B.A.

1975, Peter Charles Gwynne Gower

1991, Simon Llewellyn Guest

2005, Joan Wakeling

2014, The Rev’d Canon Tim Clement

Acknowledgements to: Church Guide by the late Mrs Horatia Durant. 1975 A History of Monmouthshire: The Hundred of Raglan (Vol. 2, part 1), p. 32-38) Sir Joseph Bradney, 1914 Vicar, Simon Guest Raglan History Detectives (an after school club for local children that have spent many years tending the grave yard and learning about their lives.

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