Raglan History Trail

From Raglanpedia
Jump to: navigation, search

En Français

Raglan Village is full of historic buildings. Our village lies at the crossroads of two Roman roads. Settlement here was well established before the Norman Conquest. St Cadoc’s Church was planted here in the 6th Century. The earliest market in Raglan is recorded in 1354. Some of houses we see today pre-date the Civil War whilst others have been here a mere 200 years or so. But they all have stories to tell about the people and places that make up our village.

The History of Raglan Village

Raglan History Trail maps are located at Beaufort Square in the High Street and at the entrance to Raglan Castle

2013-09-19 15.47.40.jpg Raglan Trail Map at Castle.jpeg CM History tour.JPG
Raglan map at Beaufort Square Raglan map at Raglan Castle Guided Tour

All the buildings below have agreed to take part in the Raglan Village History Trail. They can be recognized by the Raglan Local History Group QR Plaque attached to their gate or wall. We encourage you to visit the shops and public buildings, and to respect the privacy of private owners.


Contents

Beaufort Square

Beaufort Arms
Beaufort Arms Hotel: It was near dark before we reached Raglan and put up at The Beaufort Arms kept by a Mr. Cope where there was cleanliness, plenty, and good cooking. (George Cumberland, 1784). The Beaufort Arms, built by the Duke of Beaufort sometime before 1749, doubled as an inn as well as a district court. Read more...



Castle Street

Castle Street - on the left is the Market Cross
Castell Coch

First National School: The first National schoolmaster was Edward Lewis who served as Schoolmaster and Parish Clerk for 27 years. His wife, Mary Ann Lewis, the schoolmistress, outlived him by 10 years. Both Edward and Mary Ann are buried in St Cadoc’s Churchyard. Schools based on Dr. Bell’s system, were established around the UK (between 1797-1819). Read more...



The Malthouse

The old Vicarage: While it is not known when the first Vicar lived at the Vicarage on Castle Street, there was a building on this property before the Civil War. For at least one hundred years this house served as Raglan’s Vicarage. In 1970 a new Vicarage was built in Primrose Green. The present owners changed the name to ‘The Malthouse’. Read more...



8 Castle St

Old Post Office was originally part of the Three Salmons Inn on Castle Street. Roundheads frequented there during the Civil War. By 1841, it was the post office. Over the years 6 spinsters named Jones have served as Post Mistresses: Ann Jones (1870), Sarah Jones (1881). Sarah Evans Jones (1910), Anna Mina Jones (1914), Fay and Ann Jones (1930-1980). Read more...



1 Castle St

1 Castle Street is a quiet village home today, but it wasn't always so! It has been a working man's cottage for carpenters, tailors, grocers and bakers. During WWII, Mrs Rachel Lumley had a corner shop and cafe. She was well known for her warm hospitality, her good home cooking and her distinctive dog, Rastus - she also had 14 cats! Read more...




Chepstow Road

Chepstow Road, ca 1900. The Elm Tree on the left gave the Cottages their name
St Cadoc's Church

St Cadoc’s Church is the site of a 6th century timber church. William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, built most of the Church we see today. In 1469 Sir William ap Thomas made a will just before he was taken prisoner at the battle of Edgecote and beheaded. “I bequeath,” says the will “all the Salt that I have. As much as will make the Body and Iles of the Church at Raglan”. In 1861 it was the site of the ‘Raid on Raglan Church’ to locate the Steam engine supposedly buried in 1667 with the 1st Earl of Worcester. Perhaps this encouraged Rev Wyatt to renovate the church and extend the crowded graveyard in the late 1860’s. The St Cadoc’s Churchyard Trail tells many Raglan stories. Read more...

Community Centre

National School. In 1857 a large school accommodating up to 95 children was built next to the Church on land donated by the Duke of Beaufort. It encompassed a 1739 barn and stable belonging to the Brooks farm. At one end of the site was the constable’s lock-up. The garden was a pond where horses were once brought to water. Read more...



Brooks House

Brooks Farm: The farm gets its name from the convergence of three brooks. In 1841, the farm, owned by the Duke of Beaufort, covered 250 acres in and around Raglan Village including pastures on the Chepstow Road (where the schools and Doctor’s Surgery is now) along with Dean Cottage and most of the land on Station Road. Read more...


Dean House

Dean Cottage: Built before 1841, the Duke of Beaufort once owned Dean Cottage. It is known by some as the Manse because three Baptist Ministers lived here between 1900-1940. Cynthia Chapple (who lived here in the 40’s) recalls “I used to watch the old horse-drawn gypsy caravans making their way to Treworgan common”. Read more...



Elmcote

Elm Cottages: These two cottages and carpenter's shop can be traced to pre 1786. A dwelling has been here since before the Civil War. They are an example of simple working men's dwellings as reflected by the occupants over the years - Carpenter (1829), Tailor (1841), Beer Retailer (1841), Ag lab (1861), Cordwainer (1861), Builder (1881). Read more...



Church House, Waterloo House, The Birches

Church House: William Williams of The Arthea, Tregare, built Church House abt.1730. His daughter, Madame Pytt, a widow, became a recluse wandering through the great house after losing her husband and two children. She only left the house to attend Church each Sunday. In the 1830’s Sir Joseph Thackwell (a hero of Waterloo) purchased Church House. It has also been the home of a number of Doctors. Read more...




High Street

High Street ca 1915 - the buildings haven't changed much but today cars have replaced bicycles


Ship Inn Pub

Ship Inn: Once the location of a Sheep Market. During the siege of Raglan Castle in 1646, a skirmish between Roundheads and the Royalists is said to have occurred at The Sheep Inn. The Roundheads, who were camped at Clytha Hill and the Royalist troops, no doubt down from the castle for a pint, decided to end the siege there and then! Read more...


Exton's Outfitters

Bristol House: For nearly 200 years, grocers, drapers, outfitters and clothiers have served the village. Most of them ‘lived above the shop’ and were active in village life. Mr Cleave, a draper in the 1930’s was also the treasurer of the much beloved Raglan Brass Band. For three generations (since 1962), Exton's, continue to serve our community. Read more...



Scout Hut

Zion Independent Chapel: Today, this building is the scout hut but it was built in 1842 as a Congregational church, known as Zion Chapel. Charles Forward, a draper on High Street, gave the land on which the chapel is built. The Rev. David Lewis was the first minister there and continued until his death in 1885. In the 1930’s it was a village concert hall. It continues to serve the community. Read more...




Post Office

Old Shop: This is probably the oldest grocers and chemist’s in Raglan Village. As early as 1832, John Jones, age 25, owned and operated a grocery & chemist on this property. Subsequently, it traded as: Morgan & Evans Grocery Shop and Silverthorne's 'Olde Shoppe'. Today, the Old Shop is the village Post Office, card shop, paper shop and hardware store. Read more...





Crown Square

Crown Inn Pub

Crown Inn: For at least 180 years the Crown Inn has hosted clubs and events but none as exciting (and upsetting) as the “Navvies Riot of 1856”. The Navvies (Railway workers) didn't always get along with the locals. A fight started at the Crown Inn and engulfed the whole village before it was over. The Crown is also known as the sport’s and young farmer’s pub - having hosted their meetings and social events for many decades. Read more...




Usk Road

Usk Road in the 1930's - can you find the policeman?
James, the Butcher

Kings Head Inn: The Kings Head Inn was one of at least 5 pubs in the Village. Sometime before 1810, a house (or houses) was built for Clement Brigges, of Blackbrook. For the next 120 years publicans, maltsters and innkeepers occupied the Inn. One such innkeeper was Jane Jones/Williams who was a publican from 1861 to 1889. Today it is a much beloved Butcher’s. Read more...



Raglan Baptist Chapel & Fellowship Centre

Raglan Baptist Chapel:: The first introduction of Baptists to Raglan may have occurred during the Siege on Raglan Castle. Today's Raglan Baptist Chapel, built in 1862, is actually the third place of worship for Baptists in Raglan (along with Dean Cottage and Ebenezer Chapel). When built, it was hailed as, “a rare combination of elegance and economy”. Read more...




Private residence

The Chestnuts: Wanted, an experienced SHOEING and GENERAL SMITH" (Monmouthshire Merlin, 1835). Today the Chestnuts is a quiet house located next to Raglan Baptist Church. But it is 60 years older than the Church. For nearly 200 years, the Chestnuts was the home of the Matthews family that were ironmongers and blacksmiths. In the 20th Century, Mr W.I. Hampshire took over the Chestnut garage. He expanded the business to do a bit of everything. Read more...



Chapel Cottage

Ebenezer Chapel: This quiet cottage was built in 1821 as a Goff Free School, Baptist chapel, manse and graveyard. In 1846, attendance at Goff's School in Raglan was 45 (with 49 children on the books). In 1862, the graveyard was moved to Kingcoed Chapel and Chapel cottage housed the Baptist Sunday School, along with a meeting place and the caretaker’s residence until the 1980’s. Read more...




Station Road

Raglan Railway Station: Gone but not forgotten. The Raglan Railway Station was dismantelled in 2012 and stored at St Fagan's Outdoor museum outside of Cardiff. It is greatly missed by the Villagers of Raglan. Read more...


Learn more about Raglan and the Civil War - Raglan Under Siege

TD

Personal tools